Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

27 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

 -1. . NOTES ON NEWS. ! NOTES…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

 1. NOTES ON NEWS. NOTES ON NEWS. ¡ ?   not S? "panicky" in March, i wW, the Cprman o?n?e began and th? I. The Cohinq I-ICTOIIY. t.. outlook was full or peril I for the Allies, neithei I are we likely to lose oui heads in premature re- ) joicing now that the news HCm France is so good. We have had ) into bell-ringing for a victory which turned out to be something very j different after all, and we are not likely to make that mistake again. We shall make sure next time. The war is not won j yet. but we can see it in the process of j being won, day by day and week by week. | It may be a long time before peace comes, s but in case we should feel inclined to pessimism on that account, we may very well contrast our state of mind at this j time with what it was three months ago. j We ongh t to feel better at once. For the iiews is splendid, and it is not too | ninth to say that final and decisive victory J3 only a question of time. Few people nowadays talk about the "impregnable Get man line." Events during these few weeks have shown that it is not impreg- I naole, and before the fighting season comes to an end this year great. things may have happened which for years past We h-ave hardly dared to dream about. If the time for rejoicing has not yet come, j \V(' may at any rate look forward to it j T-itli high hoptfs and full confidence. j One cf the most satisfactory signs of the J times is to be noted in some of the com- < THE Inevitable DEFEAT. ments in the German pnpers, which arc not so ready to accept the ta lei; of withdrawals of the I German Army "accord- ing to plan as they have been in the ) past. 0 One journal, greatly daring, asks questions. It wants.to know why the. German people were told that Fraaice had ] been bled white, that Britain -was sick of i the war and on the point of defeat by j German U-boats, and that the American j Army would never reach Europe; or, if it 1 did. that it would never 1.e able to fight ] against Germans. This is only the hegin ning. There will be many more questions, < and the time is coming when they must II be answered. The Gorman rulers .are watching the storm clouds rising and spreading. They have sown the vind, and I they will be powerless agamst. the whirl- wind. For they can now see, perhaps for the first time, the certainty of decisive defeat on the Western Front. In a series of articles in the "Chronicle," general Maurice has dealt with the ques- tion whether, decisive military victory is possible for the Allies, tiid comes to the conclusion that it is, if flw British, Aimios are adequately supplied with men, and if sufficient shipping is available, for n-n. iging over ihe Americans..Both theso conditions, we may have full confidence, will he fulfilled. A gainst the rising tide «'•' the Americans, who will soon be mil- lions strong, the German hosts cannot possibly hope to stand. Defeat on the West means defeat ■ everywhere. And de- fe,.It-,Clf the West is inevitable. L r It would have been a disaster if the finest harvest known in this country for ABOt.?nrrL  j Eabvest. halfc a century could not I have been garnered j owing to the lack of suffi- cient labour. A few wf»Ks ago tflat aid seem a possibility, but, I f#rtruiately the difficulty has been over- come. Women have worked magnificently, 1 h 'x¥ 0 t;' .n and the War Office found it posaible to re- lease a number of soldiers to help. Added to these, German prisoners to the number of 27,000 have beep set to work, and though the total amount of labour has I. been considerably less than good judges would have estimated to be absolutely, accessary, fanners and labourers alike have done wonders, and it may be lipped that not a grain of corn has been wasted I | that might have been saved. The total | acreage under trope is 10 per cent. 1 j greater than in 1917, and more than at anv time in the last twenty years. The I country has never seen such a large acire- 1 age or wheat, and it is many years since | the crop looked so promising. Potatoes j are also an excellent crop, and have been J increased in quantity 25 per cent. And t the weather has been good, too, enabling i bountiful crops to be safely gathered in • < under the most favourable- conditions. The j country's food production this year should | bo a record. Whilc the corn harvest is one of the .beet record, the fruit harvest is one of the I THE Frvit < SHOETAGK. poorest. The sort lruic I crop was a failure, and it must be many years since our orchards made • utn a poor show of apples. Thousands of ?c'!?c\v:ve.s must be at their wits' end to know what they are going to do in the c()!Iling autnmn and winter without apples. e French crop is in no better case than ^ur own, and will certainly leave no margin for export. In an ordinary year e should have felt the shortage very little, as our deficiency would have been j Jnade up by iinports from Canada and the J United States, where the crop is excel- lent. Some apples will no doubt cross the Atlantic, but the tonnage difficulty is a very serious one. There are no ships to spare for anything but absolutely neces- sary things, and it may be that apple-tart "will be during the coming months an i almost unattainable luxury. Because of I the shortage of apples the Government ar(,, now (,oing to control marrows, in order at as large a supply as possible of this "seful vegetable may go to the jam manu- ^-•turers. Meanwhile, the greater pro- of the population seems to be leisure hours in picking black- rJes, of which there fortunately appears to ea r&markably fine crop. i Tho tu.(: f 1 d Tllc, ""gent necessity for saving coal and s iOUM irive all imnctus to the estab- V k I -?TIQXAL ? J ??rCHE?s. Iishment of national I kitchens. A good number I of these exceedingly I 1 j valuable institutions were ?? art. €? last winter in different parts of i fbo ??T?'?' ??' though the need for t th?m"? been naturaHv less pressmg Huung J** warm weather, it is to be ,boped that plan f?. setting them to work throughout the 0 ntry h?? been thought out, so that it can be put. into operation without loSil of time. The quantity of coal and gas that would be saved bv com- l munal as compared with individual." housb- 1 I hold cooking is- enormous, while the saving 1 In labour and food furnishes another 1 Pwerful argument in favour of national j. 1 Kitohens.

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GALLANT FISHERMEN'S FIGHT…

f THE' MUSSEL'S HABITS.'!

A It-OMAN BATH.

I PAINTER'S FATAL FALL.

BOY SCOUTS FINED.i

OUR NAVAL ANTHEM.j

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 I PERONNE TAKEN. I ? PERONNE…

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HOW BRITISH LOOKED AFTER HOLY…

i. "SPLICING THE MAIN BRACE."

FACING FEARFUL ODDS.II

WHEN BEKUN HAS BEEN CAPTURED…

IFISHERMEN'S BIG EARNINGS.I

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FUN AND FANCY.

I "OVER 57.0CO PRISON EES…

' [ v I f4AVAL CHANGES. -…

ILADY WELFARE WORKERS.

I"AMIENS SAVED BY TANKS.'

1 PARCELS FOR RUSSIA.

WHERE TORPEDOES ARE.

I. ! ASSISTANT COAL CONTROLLER.…

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