Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

33 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

{ÄLL RIGHTS RESIRVIZD.1 PENSION…

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{ÄLL RIGHTS RESIRVIZD.1 PENSION PROBLEMS: HOW TO SOLVE THEM. By AN EXPERT. Difficulties Being Grappled With by Those "On Top"—The Four Stages of Army Devetopment- The Truth About Election Pledges-The Position of "Z" Reserve Men-The New Function of the Ministry of Labour: An Important Announcement. FREE ADVICE TO OUR READERS. It often ha ppens that we are immersed to such an extent in our own affairs that we pay little heed to difficulties not our own. But none of us live to ourselves, and as we .are citizen*, oi no mean country it behoves ud to give sympathetic attention and sup- port to the men who are shouldering the heavy burdens of statesmanship in these davei. ,¿ # a » Let us, for instance, consider what Mr. Winston Churchill, the Minister of War, has been confronted with. Not long ago, he gave the House of Commons an inkling of the taaks to .ich he and the Army Council j had set their hands in ircliWo?? r as 1 these. There are four distinct htaga? of Army development in proems at the pre?e?t t m -e. First of all, there are the great armies of four cr five millions of men that won the war. These are iiid are already largely demobilised. Secondly, I there are the armies of occupation now rapidly forming Cl a compulsory basis, which approximate to 900,000 men, subject to euch reductions later on in the year as circumstances may permit. Thirdly, there is the Volunteer Regular Army for the im- mediate garrisoning- of the Empire, formed out of trained men who re-engage for one, two, three, or more years. Fourthly, there is the permanent after-war army, built up out of new young recruits who have to be trained. All the.se four stages overlap each other, and develap out of each other, and all are at the present moment in simul- taneous activity. The brain reels at the thought of the difficulties such vast work entails, and it is to the infinite credit of the authorities concerned that so few com- plaints arise. jp!aint,- Pr-s2. In no other way, except on a temporary compulsory basis, could sufficient .soldiers be I obtained for winding-up the war and gar- nering the fruits of victory. Otherwise, by the terms of engagement, the military ma- chine would fall to pieces on the conclusion of peace, when, things have fallen out, there is work to be done in order to ensure the due carrying out of our terms. The plan that has been in operation is to let three men out of four go, and to pay the fourth man double to finish the job. Now, as always, there are people who 6cek to make party advantage out of every un- expected turn in national events. Such is the cry that Ministers promised there should be no conscription, and that they have J broken their election pledges by reason of the retention cf a limited form of compul- sory military -,ervice till April c.0, 1920. I have taken some trouble to investigate this charge, and you will agree with me when I eay that in view of the following statements the charge is wholly unfounded. At Bristol, during the General Election, the Prime Minister said: "Whether you will require conscription in the future in any shape or form depends not on the opinion which I have expressed here on this platform: it will depend entirely on the terma of peace." On another occasion the Prime Minister gave expression to the same idea which Mr. Winston Churchill expressed at Dundee, when he said: '"N o one will try harder than the British Government to prevent conscrip- tion being continued after the war. We shall go to the Peace Conference and de- I mand that all nations shall give it up, but what we do must depend on what other nations do." No promise has been broken, and no one in this country can ba held ac- countable for the driving force of the neces- sities abroad, which have compelled the Government to retain some of the enlisted men till the clouds roll by. Nothing could be clearer than the statement of the Secre- tary of State for War, March 6, 1919: 1-We do not consider ourselves entitled to fasten a perma-nant system of conscription upon the people of this country. We' are doing everything in our power to render such a state of affairs impossible." state of af?air6 ir,,po&sible." From inquiries I have received, and from other sources, I gather that some definite information about the position and rights j of men who have been transferred to Z Reserve would be welcome. According to Army Order 1 of 1919, "No soldier will for- feit "the right to consideration for a dis- ability pension, or the right to payment of any pension, by reason of his transfer to Class "Z" Army Reserve. This in ea as that a Z man, though he entered no claim on dispersal, is still able to claim a pension through his Local War Pensions Committee, if his health has been impaired by his war services. note t- e .-ic" note the fact that from May 1 the Ministry of Labour became responsible for the training of dis- charged and demobilised men. (V-mrmun- oations with regard thereto should be made to the local Employment Exchange of a man's district. j In future, th3 Ministry of Pensions will confine itself to training during the time when a disabled man still requires medical care and attention. War Pensions Com- mittees wii! continue to be re-sponsible for j the payment of allowances, and will also submit "any training scheme which they may have formulated to the Ministry of Labour. New training centres and institutions are to' be set up with a view to affording dis- charged and demobilised men every possible facility for learning trades. If ycu want to take advantage of this scheme, you must make your wants known to the loca.l Em- plovment Exchang, ,:b.ich is revised for your assistance. AN-WER.- TO CORRESPONDENTS. R. W. G. (Denton).—Am making inquiry about your first question. As to small holding, 'apply in first instance to Secre- tarv of the County Council, Maidstone. H. H. (Toynham).—Write to the Secre- tary cf year nearest War Pensions Com- mittee (the Tiost office will give you the address*. and explain the facts: (1) claim a contribution to the funeral expenses (2) and a dependent's pension. Our Pensions Expert is anxious to assist sailors and soldier, and their wives and de- pendents in dealing with intricacies of the War Pensions System. Address your queries to "Pensions Ex- pert," c/o Editor of this paper. All essen- tial facts should be stated as briefly as pos- sible, such a-s name, number, rank, regi- ment of soklier, name and rating of sailor, particulars of families and eeparation al- lowance and (in inquiries concerning civil liabilities) pre-war or pre-enlistment in- come, present or war income, and full lia- bilities. Do not &end any documents, birth certificates, or discharge papers, etc. Will correspondents please make a point of sending their regimefttal number, rank, name, and regiment?

I TERRITORIAL FORCE.I

I CAVALRY MEMORIAL SERVICE.I…

I LAND FOR EX SERVICE MEN.I

IDISMISSED FOR DESERTION.…

I A DANGEROUS TOY. I

I BOILERMAKERS £17 A WEEK.…

I DOMINION TROOPS. -I

I DEATH COINCIDENCE.I

BRIDGE LOSSES IN THE TRAINI

I ACCIDENT ^RESTORES SPEECH.I

I OUT-OF-WORK PAY FRAUDS.…

I THREE BOYS KILLED. BY SHELL.t

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ICOLONEL TO CONSTABLE. I

IAN ORDERLY'S HEROISM. _I

I-TOO MUCH FOR WHISKY. I

I NAVY'S -PEACE -MARCH.I

MORE GAS AND COAL.I

|HOUSING SCHEMES. I

jA GIGANTIC BIRD CAGE.I

A HUGE MAF. I

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I * BLAZING 'PLANE.

THE SEASHORE MURDER.

A BARBARIC CUSTOM SURVIVAL.

A "MOITEL" TEACHER.

ANOTHER COALITION DEFEAT.

ONE NUMBER MISSING.

ITHE LONGEST ENGLISH LAWSUIT.

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I EPITOME OF NEWS. IEPITOMINEWS.

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