Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

TALKS ON HEALTH. ! -i

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

TALKS ON HEALTH. BT A FAMILY DOCTOR. A CHILD'S TEETH. A child's teeth should be carefully cr.auiined periodically by it* mother. Every I?:?Lcit?t be looked ?t ??r?ft.Hy and a k-h-ort Lent, l'y ,;Ch A:t\:?ti A ail s p ..? ot' decay in Au.fa.st will have 'cciae a hollow too? ?v tie nd of the y ar, and you '.?i?I 0e b't awake ail night L v the cryinr c' th? t?i? i.. r.??t. ?. iie.u- ?"c" ycu. ca'M c i? ??? the pom of mF :ff;[l; ;L ;:{Oi,l:I s.hamc d of m'v-? f for R?t protecting- my 'nId frc" the dreadful i g?y he is ;u 1 i;'i->uld h."i7o hud tlie toota seen to long ago, Had the child I ought to have protected is ?tMrhi?so.vfiommyowanr??t.' The mild cannot help C!.¡ng with th ach:.9g t?th, fo" there is no ?.—.? rain Ir is ;;fÏ:jltst\c' ;il"or;i-ik;]ll [ the t.?ht. Hew M-'d you c? p ?t H? poor LUie thin^ to have ?!:? -yi?.?ii to look after him elf? You ??r ic?.?cd ac his t.-eth, you never bought htm a tooth-brush, you never shewed him how to Uae a tooth- brush. you never, perhaps, used one vour- to set him a good example, and here he i, in pain. Tootnache ia a horrible pain; protect" your child against it bv all tlie means you have in year power. I C )     -?7- I SOAP AND Y,TAIT.It. Soap and water cannot be used too freely. Rrir,ember tnat iact, will you? Manv skin carcases could be cured and ruinv otlier., prevented with soap and water alone, with- ou* any ointment- cr lokon. It is no trood going to a doctor for .-yrrpathy when ° you or vour children are suffering from what are en,1 led "dirt leases. "I The 'advice he would give you would be to keco yoiiTe.dx. ■■-our children, and yoKr heu". cleat). That ia straight talk, but- it fe good advice. and I make no apology fcr IHV aru-uptness. 0 T"-DFC'IO OF CIILr'E'' I ..1.j,. UJ The most important years of any perso" are these of infancy and childhood. *A heavy responsibility rests ou the shoulders of parents. I am sorry to >,y that there is a mistaken tendency to wait until the child complains, and then, of cov.i-3e, the harm may be done. One of the finest and most beneficial xmovements of recent years has 1 been the institution of medical inspection of school children. I have often wished to have a c.a-s of mothers—and fathers, too— sitting with ire as I examine a .school class of children. It would surprise them to see what a number of 'defects. are found which adversely affect the child's future. The mental attitude cf the parents is, I con- sider, often cue of moral cov/ardicc they have not the personal courage to submit their children to the examination of a doc- tor fcr rear that some defect may be dis- covered. They prefer to live ill' a fool's paradise of ignorance. COMPLAINTS NIPPED IN THE BUD. I L. setut WCTK has been done amongst the children. With tn#» help of .parents, hun- of complaints can be nipped in the tm-il that would otherwise certainly develop. -,ne U, re of the A-. one example, tr' No child is born with i crooked oack the deformity grows year bv year while the child is actually under the care of lis parents. At first a very slight, scarcely perceptible curve in the wrong direc- tion in six months, Uie curve is accen- tuated; in a year the spine is deformed; i> ;t. alas, the child docs not complain, and nothing is done. Then, by a stroke of good fortunes medical inspection is instituted at the school the practised eye of the sur- detects the commencing deformity at once, and immediate steps are taken; a procious child is saved from the ranks of the cripples. A large number of deformi- ty are to rickets and rickets is a preventable disease. AM so I could make a long list of defects and illnesses that could bo prevented. NVill yon please remember that' prevention is better than err, -:0: IMPORTANCE OF DIAGNOSIS. -'L"" -1.l.Ã- -ü JL-J.I ..c'J. ii doct-ox» ar-d- tt-e -n-,tbn,- start riit with the idea that they want to join ha i-rls in t-f-e fight against n"1S", one of the mcst i-iipoi'taat and essential facts to bear in in inf is that the doctor should be given a chance at as early a "ébt" as possible. In Cv well-known scourges of cancer and th. wc I- scot tr g os of career d tubcrenLcsis, it is no exaggeration to sav T I th2 Urst essential is early diagnosis I hate t. tHnk that there are  pu??? case3 t:,) tlink that there ar?, at,.f -? consumption :Iti-e very earliest- '4 of ec)nstiniption T b. a7,'e-Led "it is oll'y n-M, "ar t ,1 --7 doctor asks is a chance to at ?'???0 m?cr"Lc?. Do net refrain from  ?i?'? in a lii?dica! ma:? lUltii the patient t L 1 Lh' d is n?xt to death's door. SINS OF SICK-ROOill VISITORS. I Foolish things are often done by friends ¡ who go to visit a patient either at home or in the hospital. The other day I heard of a case cf a mother taking a large picee of cake i:ito the hospital where her little son was lying ill with typhoid. The little' boy had complaincd that he was given nothing to eat, being too young to under- ston-i that in dealing with ,a disease that causes ulceration of the intestine it k; im- possible to give anything but slops. The cake was smuggled into the boy's bed while the nurse was not looking; it was greedily devoured and alas, the inevitable hap- pened. It is criminal to disobey the strict ir- aileti.Ii i of those who are doing their lest to get the patient well. I CHEERFUL CONVERSATION. I Visitors often stay too long and weary the in-olid out v.ith their incessant cackling. And, often, the choice of subjects is too ^Stupid for words. Some visitors seem to tak- a fierdi-h delight in recounting several ca-ees they hav^-kadwn. of the same illness, all of which have ended fatally in the tocond week. Others are so anxious to show their sympathy that they have a good cry ever the bed that does no good. It is best make a kind inquiry about the patient's condition and then dismiss the subject alto- gether. Do net discuas the latest murder or shipwreck or cool mine disaster. If there is any bad I!C\'i'S keep it bock. Do not be the first to convey the tidings of a sad event which can. do the poor sufferer no good to kcw. £ 11 CIV. THE ART OF VISITING. I Never d1t.w a look of concern to appear on your face; if the friend you are visiting does look pale and thiu, you must itill wear an expression, of confidence and make her think that she is much better than you could ever have expected, If ou take flowers do i-,ot -let them be cf heavy or sickly odour. If ybu tak? a present of something to eat or drink, do not fail to ask first whether it i; allowed. A bc-ttle of port for someone who has be-n forbidden alcohol i3 a useless or-rent, although the other num- bers of the fami-y may be *,?y grateful to you. B? a good listener; if thq patient wishes to say something let her have full opportunity cf ha'.ing .t.: r i-ay even, tfcorgh ehe may espfess hprse"1?^ very 'slowly. Do not brea& in with a noisy interruption. Be very quiet ;-a,' th- -r:r; do net Lick the bed or kncck a cf flowers over, -or rattle the fire-irons. Do 1') £ o.:sip about the doctor cr nurse: do rv rvthin? you can. to cultivate and i:ic;ee > tr.e faith the patiert hafs in her attendants. It is quite an art to know how to visit a y. itient, ulici few have acquired it.

[No title]

I OTHER MEN'S MINDS.

[No title]

HOME DRESSMAKING.

IFASHION OF THE WEEK.I

RECORDS IN RAPID PAINTING.…

,CHINESE CRACKERS. I

[No title]

— — - _________________________…

THINGS THOUGHTFUL

[No title]