Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

43 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

"GET YOUR BACK INTO iT."I…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

"GET YOUR BACK INTO iT." —M r. Lloyd George. • PREMIER'S GREAT SPEECH TO SAVE THE COUNTRY FROM INDUSTRIAL RUIN. THE NEED FOR INCREASED PRODUCTION. (By Our Special Correspondent.) House cf Commons, Monday. When 1 arrived :t ttie Hou-e of Common.? jn Monday afternoon it >.ru> apparent that great event, were afoot. V ii desirous cf gaining admissi<j:ito?e? the Prenuer' promised "opening- c, f the secret loi x friends sending cards of application for terviews with members, unci members. th* selves flitting1 here and there, from Loi;;)y to Hou-e, were everywhere in evidence. Precisely at five minutes to four Mi. Lloyd George, wearing a ijrev mornintr-coat suit, rose to address a j a eked house; and it was not until five minutes to seven exactly that he sat down, thus making for three s l? i n o i- 11- ?, e hours a continuous exposition of the posi- tion oll the country. NEED FOR HARD WORK. I One oi the leading points oi his speech was that Effort has got. to be quickened, tightened. Employers, managers, lore- men and workmen must get their backs into it to save the country. There was never a more fatal fallacy than that the less you work the more work there will be for others. :lr:iln::g a:r 1:):;S :jde".1 the Premier, \n' mi?ht record the Govern ment s trade policy as follows: Trade.—Import restrictions to be with- drawn on September 1. Control oi the ex- change to end. This, may have the effect r seme time of increasing^ the prices! food and ru.w material, especially of goods whuh come from America. The Board of Trade to be equipped with emergency powers to chck any sudden and undue importation of goods at prices altogether below the cc-ts of production here owing to the collap.-e ■ f the exchanges. Ariiiy. -ider--tt-,Ie reductions in the Army Estimates to be possibly effected. Mines.—The Government could not accept Mr. Justice Sankey's scheme for State pur- chase. They accepted in principle his scheme for unification and reorganisation. The Government accepted the policy of Star.' purchase of the mineral rights in coal. A fund would be established out of the pur- chase value to secure a oetter standard of iinusT among the miners. FORTY THOUSAND MILLION?. I The Premier said all he was asking now was that everybody, realising the gravity cf the position, would give a fair and impar- tial consideration to the suggestion., the Government put forward, realising that the future of the land depended upon the way these difficulties were met. The direct cost of the war to the world was fortv thousand millions, spent not in productive energy, but spent largely in de- struction. How could they expect the world to return to normal the moment that expen- diture was* ov<V? There ufc a shortage of labour; there was a shortage of material; there were great transport3 difficulties; and there .were toi,es of great accumulated stocks of manu Pic- tured goods in foreign countries which, on the signature of peace, rush this country and depress prices. Trade had steadily improved, but we have fetili our worst troubles to face. The outstanding fact was the alarming :Kiv*»r.e balance of trade. Before the war we had the greatest international trade in the world. We could not prosper—we could not even exi"t-without recovering, maintain-1 I Ll,- tr?i d e. Before t h iM.?. and incrt?-in?our trade. Before the war our imports exceeded exports by ilod,000.000. Last July our exports were -(-j.) ,noo,oo¡) and our imports £ 141,000,000. If that rate was maintained, instead of an adverse balance of £ 150,000,000 we should have one of £ 1,000,000,000. Taking the aver- age throughout the year, the adverse beianee, unless there wavs a great improve- ment. would be between £ 700,000,000 ,i tid £ 800,000,000. As far as receipts were con. cerned, from our foreign investments we were We have got to pav the adverse b« lance of trade of L I THE NATIONAL DEBT. I The national indebtedness was anothej I disquieting feature. Before the war our I National Debt was £ 1645,000,000, and we were disturbed bv it. Our interest on sink- ing funds was £ 24,500,000. To-dav our National Debt is fc?.StN).000,000. As against that we have the indebtedness of the Allies and the Dominions and India for but the interest and sinking fund together will come to £ 400,000,000. That i- our debt, instead of costing us • £ 24,(XX) ,000, will involve an annual charge of ^400,000,000. Pensions are an absolutely new charge of £lW).OOO,OOO per annum. To meet this condition of things—an ad- verse trade balance which is alarming, an increased expenditure which i.s inevitable, sinking fund and interest upon debt—there is but one. resource, that is, increased pro- duction. Vet we are .-pending more, we are earning less. We are consuming more, we arc- producing less. It cannot last. I NEWS FOR LABOUR. I Dealing with the question of labour, Mf Lloyd George went on to say that he did not suggest that the last word had been eairl about hours or about wages. 'There has been," he remarked, "an In- dustrial Couucil set up of representative em- ployers and representative workmen which has been sitting for months examining to- gether these various problem.s-the prob- lem ot hours and wages, of unemployment, and the problem of control. I am very glad to .-•ay that they have reached a fair measure ot ugreemefit upon two or tTiree of those problems. Amongst others, they have reached all agreement upon the problem of hü;n' and the problem of wages. "A measure has been prepared by the Minister of Lary-ur to deal with both hours and wages. lie introduced it to-day at the commencement of business. In .substance, it means a declaration of a l-i-'our week t" all industries of the country, with two or three exceptions; and it :1:"0 provides for a living wage for those who are engaged in industry in this coun- try. Tiio^e measures are, I think, the most important measures dealing with Labour problems which have ever been submitted to the judgment of this llou*o." FAVOURABLY RECEIVED. I It is safe to say that the speech created on the whole a favourable impression in the Lobby, and the chief criticism came from the extreme tariff men a.nd from the Labour members, some of whom smarted under the straight lecture which the Prime Minister administered.

I RIOTING IN IRELAND. I

[No title]

-HAM PROFITEERS FINED I

DISMISSED POLICE.I

WHERE THE 110ADS A LIE 'MIOTICII."

CURLY-HEADED MEN OBSTINATE.

I NEGROES NOT BLACK.I

[No title]

! A NEW PERSIA.I I

SUICIDE'S 55 FEET LEAP. I

HEBE OF THE TEA-SHOP. I

NEW MINISTER OF AGRICULTUREI

PETROL BLAZE AT BRISTOL. t

RAILWAY CLERKS..I

CAPE DESPAIR, t

A GIANT TREE.I

IDEADLY SUSPENSE. f

[No title]

THE MINERS BEATEN, i

"LIGHTNING" TACT ICS TOI BECOME…

SUGAR FOR BEES.I

THE CHURCH AND HOUSING. I

LINCOLN'S BISHOP DEAD. I

MINE MAGNATE BEREAVED. I .-I

"LIVE RAIL" TRAGEDY.I

[No title]

TO STOP PROFITEERING

[No title]

"FALL-IN THE FIRING PARTY!"

ILORD GREY FOR U.S.A. LORD…

I A TALE OF THE SEAS.

I MR, CHAS COBORN..

IROYAL MATRIMONY.,

I COMPELLED TO CONFESS. I

[No title]

FATAL ACCIDENT, WITH NINETEEN…

I A TELESCOPE'S TALE.

I A WOMAN'S CRUELTY.

ILORD INVERCLYDE DEAD.

IKINGS PLUNGE INTO SEA.

I A WONDERFUL "LAKE."

[No title]