Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

48 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

OUR LONDON LETTER.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

OUR LONDON LETTER. [From Our Special Correspondent.] London. When- Parliament re-opens a new man ia likely to be seen constantly on his feet handling questions arising out of the strike. This is Sir Rhys Williams, Bart., D.S.O., M.P., the new Par- liamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Transport, who has been to Sir Eric Geddee throughout the last few strenuous years what Colonel FitzGerald was to Lord Kitchener. The member for Banbury has probably filled more responsible executive positions during the war than any member of the House outside the Cabinet. Granted a commission in the Grenadier Guards in November, 1914, he was transferred with the rank of captain to the Welsh Guards, which he helped to raise. Wounded at Locs in 1915. and mentioned in dispatches, he re- ceived the D.S.O. Two months later he was sent to Persia as Military Attache at the British Legation. Teheran, and was with the Russian troops throughout the campaign of 1916. On returning to England Sir Guy Granet, then Director-General of Movements and Railways at the War Office, asked him to joia his Department, and subsequently, in July, 1917, he was promoted to lieut- color.el on his appointment as Assistant Director- General. Sir Rhys Williams paid frequent visits to France, representing Sir Gtv Granet at various inter-allied transport conferences, and later to Italy, where he spent three months on the staff of Major- General W. H. Grey, the Director-General of Transportation, Italy. In February, 1918, at the request of Sir Eric Geddes, who has a hig-h ouinion ot Sir Rhys, he became Deputy-Director of Training and Staff Duties at the Admiralty. Subsequently, under Sir Eric, ho was engaged in speediug- up demobilisation, and went from that im- mediately to the work of assisting in the drafting of the Transport Bill. ALLEUST IN THE CITY. I General Allenby had a great reception when he went to receive the Freedom of the City of London. I have rarely witnessed a more intensely enthusiastic crowd, and the greeting which the hero of Palestine received from the distinguished company within the Guildhall was hardly less vociferous than that which came from the multitude in the streets. Even the great welcome accorded to the Prime Minister—who made his first public appearance since the strike settlement --did not eclipse, and should not eciipc-. J London's tribute to one of the most brilliant and popular of our military leaders in the great war. Mr. Lloyd George's speech at the luncheon at the Mansion House dealt. almost perforce, with the strike, and showed j that the Government y;s well prepared for I "ueh an emergency. In responio to numerous | demands from the crowd, Mr. Lloyd George went out on to the balcony of the Mansion House and thanked the City again for its cordial greeting. Altogether it was a most notable occasion. j LaELAND. I A good deal of nonsense is being talked and written with regard to the alleged neces- sity for some instaut action towards settle- ment in Ireland. Otherwise, say some of the wi-seacres, the Home Rule Act will become operative—and nobody wants that. There is no reality in this danger, for the Home Rult. Act cannot become operative until Peace has been ratified by all concerned, and that is not likely to be this side of Christmas any- how. Wliat is happening about Ireland is that a Cabinet Committee has been ap- pointed to re-explore this difficult territory, and to work out the main lines of a settle- ment. Mr. Walter Long's presence oil that Committee is a sign of the times, as is his whole attitude to this problem. Time was, and not so long -ago, vhen Home' Rule or mythin? like it had no mere implacable foe than the present First Lord of the Admiralty. Mr. Long, like many other Unionists, has had to face the fact that Ireland must be dealt with, and that ehe cannot be permanently or properly dealt with. except on the lines to which the 1 Coalition is plodged, that is to say, on the basis of self-government I PEDIGREES. I I had an interesting chat the other day with Mr. Aloysius Lumbye, well known to all frequenters of the British Museum Read- ( ing Room and the Record Office as a man of extraordinary learning in all matters genea- logical. Personally, I have never been able to understand why anyone should, except for some very material reason, be interested in tho roota of hii family tree. What is the use of a man's great-great-grandfather having had brains, or money, if he has none himself? However, Mr. Lumbye tells me that people are still keen. especially in I America, in tracing their pedigrees. Before the war, said this venerable scholar in an out-of-the-way branch of learning, many wealthy Arncricana came over here every summer for no other reason than to fix up their genealogical charts' During the war such work as has been done from the States has been done by correspondence, but Mr. Lumbye anticipates a whole invasion of "Japhets in search of their fathers next rummer. The old gentleman confided to me with a chuckle that the origins of some of those who c?eek traces of noble blood are, well, the revere of what is desired when it is possible to trace them at all. I GHOSTS. I The Rev. Walter Wvnn has sent me a copy of his book entitled "Rupert Lives." This Tolume is after—a long way after-Sir Oliver Lodge's "Raymond," and purports to give evidence that the author's -on, who was killed in France in 1917, is alive, and has held converse with his mundane pro- genitors. All I can say about it is that any. one who would be convinced of the truth of Spiritualism by such "facts" as are here set forth is credulous beyond all argument. How useful it must be to be provided as Mr. Wynn seems to be with friends en thb "other side" who see to the pilying < f one's hotel bills (page ^4i. Such phenomena 0 pEon up inestimable possibilities. We may yet counteract high prices by getting clothes and other necessities from tradesmen who have "past over" into the realms where rent. collectors cease from troubling and the in- come-tax payer is at rest—perhaps. For the one certain thing about Spiritualism is that if it is true there is no rest for the de. parted. An unhallowed thought, as it secins to me. NEW MUSICAL COMEDY. I There was a big house at the Gaiety for the production of "The Kiss Cail," which is, I need not say. a musical comedy not very much off the beaten track which such things follow. The audience liked it, to judge by their reception of i t, and I am bound to sav that as such productions go it was quite good. Nothing very original either in the music or in the plot-for this musical comedy has a plot: and dances and dresses were quite up to the Gaiety standard. Mr. G. P. Huntlev riadc- the most of a part ob- viously very much to his liking; but I have seen Mr. Stanley Lupino more happily en- gaged. This trhovr will no doubt run for many and many a lively night, but I cannot say that the popularity of such perform- ances indicates a very high standard of art on the part of the theatre-going public. The other day I saw some suggestions for "livening up" Shakespeare: Heaven help e deserve it'

[No title]

I PEACE TREATY.

DOG'S LIFE SAVED.I DOG'S LIFE…

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I GREAT TRADE IRECOVERY.

IDANGERS OF PRUSSIANISM.I

GERMAN DEPUTY SHOT.I

j THE PRACTICAL -LOVER.I

CWT. COAL LIMIT. I

I CAUGHT BY BURGLAR ALARM.I

ADAM AND EVE FILM.I

LIVE FOR EVER.

STRUGGLE IN COURT. I

PEERESS'S ROMANCE.

MEAT FREED.

IAMERICAN AIR DERBY. I

RUM AS LIFE-SAVER.

THE KING'S CHAUFFEUR.

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IGERMANS TAKE RIGA.

NEW RATION CARDS. I

! FILMING AT NIGHT. I

THE DANGEROUS EEL I

IBACK TO WORK.

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INSPIRING GENIUS. I

MURDERER EXECUTED. I

TEMPORARY PROMOTIONS. I

I SOME WALK.I

i—~ I FLYING MAIL SMASH. I

IFAMOUS DRAPER DEAD.

jCOAL CONTROLLER RESIGNS.…

rJOUBERT DEAD. I

I SIXTY-FIVE MILLIONS LOST.

IFIGHTING THE PROFITEER J

BEATTY NEW SEA LORD.I

I-i TYPEWRITERS FORSAKEN.I

!DETECTIVES OUTDONE. I

CALLOUS CONDUCT. I

I RACING MOTORIST'S FEAT.…

[No title]

WHISKY.i

r SOME MYSTERY STORIES.

SOME FIND! I

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I NOTES ON NEWS.

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