Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

44 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

A BRIGHT FUTURE. /.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

A BRIGHT FUTURE. THE PREMIER SEES UNPRECEDENTED CHANCES IN THE WORLD'S MARKETS. ALL MUST WORK. When the freedom of ShefF.eld was con- ferred on Air. Lloyd George a cabinet of Sheffield cutlery was presented to him before 2,000 people in the Victoria Ha! In acknowledging the gift Mr. Llovd George praiced the .services of the city in the production of munitions. Ninety per cent, of the :tee! production utilised in the war came from Sheffield and its environs. If the battlefield of Prussian militarism lies rusty and rent on the ground they would find on it the dint of Sheffield steel. VAST OPPORTUNITIES. Tha long-expected speech made by the Premier at the Cutlers' Feast, when he said we have signed peace with our most formid- able foes, and it is time we set down earnestly to work. There is a natural dis- inclination to set ourselves to the monoton- ous tasks of peace, but I think the time has oome when tht- nation—all ranks and all grades of all pursuits—should settle down in earnest to work. Our burdens art, heavier than they were. and our need. are greater and our standards are higher. Yes, bnt our opportunities are vaster. That is the situation. Up to the hour before the war the National Debt was 645 millions. The National Debt to-day is nearly 8,000 mil- lions. There were to-day, in .spite of the losses of war, 200,000 more men and women engaged in industry. We had got 400,000 for whom employment had not yet been tfound. There were 400.000 or 500,000 more to be demobilised. That was the problem* of to-day. We can only solve it in one way, and that is by increasing production. The first country that solved that problem would rise to heights of success and honour which would surpass the highest previous re- cord ever attained. This land, whose calm courage, whose endurance and whose com- mon sense had enabled it to triumph over 60 many obstacle. would, be believed, triumph over this. ALWAYS A MARKET. Supposing this country produced more than ever it did, would there be a market for it? Unhesitatingly, yes. They had the arrears of five years of war throughout the world. All the great manufacturing coun- tries of Europe were during that period con- ,ir i n g that T)er l c d con- centrating their energies on the production of material for war. The world was now in need of essential commodities, and they had to-day got not only day-to-day employment, but they had also to liquidate those arrears, aud they had ail that was done during the war to make good. The deva.statiollci of war have to be re- paired, and the countries which at one time v,-ere about the ric!ie>t in the world have had their resources vastly reduced, and now there are unlimited possibilities opened up for the manufacturing energies of the world. I have no fears of the demand. It is sup- ply I am worrying about. There is enough work in sight for many years, and at the end of that period prosperity will have raised the standard of living throughout tne world to Mich an extent that there will be a.n increase in the demand for the commodi- ties which this country is pre-eminently sup- plyiilg. INSPIRATION. I want to invoke inspiration in all man- ners of trades as to the best way of coping with this difficulty. Can we get our fair share in supply in these times" Upon thi.s depends good ,w-Lge.i, reasonable hours, comfortable homes, and fair profits Can it be done? It de- pends on three or four considerations. The first is peace—peace abroad, peace at home. We have settled peace with Germany. Let us see it is a real peace. It depends upon us. It is not the British habit to nag, to Us. It I ti i,?ot t h ,?, br iti,i ha'r)it to nag, to harry, to insult, and to trample on a bleed- ) Kig foe. "b long Germany conforms to I the conditions we have laid down in the past, we must give our enemies a clear chance to lead a decent, honourable exist- ence. GET AT IT. As long as war was to be made he was only one out of millions who threw every- thin,, be had into it. Now that they had peace let them throw all the best they had iuto that as well. But we must have peace at home. Indus- trv cannot ma ke its arrangements, compli- catcd and delicate, when its confidence is disturbed. To secure production we must have everybody ^working with goodwill. To gecure goodwill there must be confidence all round. Capital must have confidence. Labour must have confidence. Capital must have confidence that its enterprise will bo fairlv remunerated. I do not mean extrava- gant profit. Extravagant profit ultimately clogs the wheels of industry. I mean a fair, legitimate reward for fair, legitimate risks and business enterprise. LABOUR !'CST BE CONFIDENT. Labour mast also feel confidence. Labour roust fed confident that it will share the re- wards of prosperity. It must r.wl confident that It is not go wig to be thrust back into the morass and quagmire from which five years of war had extricated it at the cost of millions of lives. It must be treated as if it had 'a real interest in the success of the con. eerlY-that it was not a hireling, but a real oartnecr in the great ousine-s.3 of Great Britain. That was why he wished great efforts were made on both sides—capital and labour, employer and workman-to secure co-opera- tion and a sense of common understanding that the country belonged to all. What was needed more than ever was & good understanding between capital and labour, and he was confident that that could be achieved. Let them come face to face and try to understand each other. The less the Government interfered the better, and the more the employers and workmen settle these things together the better it will be. LIMITLESS RESOCRCES. Tie full resources of this country are not yet developed. We can use our transport ,v-A.eyn to assist in the regeneration of the rural life of the country Another point wherein the Government can assist is the development pf power. The Government at the present moment I were en gaged in passing through the Electric Power Bill, with a view to re-organ- ising electric power and encouraging the co- operation of all those who were interested. He trusted that in the autumn Session they would be able to carry through the House of Commons a Bill making- it possible to har- ness this great power and give the aid to in- dustry which is 60 badly needed. But machine power was not the last word. There was a word, the deep significance of which they learnt in the war, and that was man-power. They realised during the war that manpower was vital to national security. The men were necessary to bear the strain of industry just as they bore the strain of war. The question of education was also an im- portant one. The best troor-s in every coun- trv came from the best educated areas, and what made the better soldier made the better workman. To increase the productive quality of men was ono of the most impor- tant tasks iu front of us. and he had great hopes of it. I QUESTION OF WASTE. At a luncheon held at Messrs. Hadfieid s works, Tiusley, the Premier said, in reply to the toa-st of hl s I to the toast of his Majesty's Ministers, pro- posed by Sir Robert Hadiield: I promised that I would say a few words on the question of public expenditure, and as my time is very short I am going to say a few words about economy. Without production there would be no- thing to economise upon, and, on the other hand, it does not matter how much you pro- duce, for if you spend too much your pro- duction is in vain. Therefore I beg every- body that those interested in economy should also put in a word for production, and those interested in production should keep an eye on economy. You have got to have both in order to save the State. It is not merely the public expenditure; the nation must economise for some years. We !?arnt that lesson during the war. I am afraid that we rushed rapidly to the conclu- sion that the time had come for spending. The nation must save; and by the nation I mean the public who constitute the nation. The Government is the biggest spender; of course, it has more to spend; and as the Government is naturally the most conspicu- ous spender it should set an example. [ "OLD TIMES GONE." If any man harbours the delusion that when things return to the normal it is go- ing to be anything like the days when I was Chancellor of the Exchequer—and which you must all view with regret-if anyone harbours that we are going to get back to the days of the Is. 2d. income-tax, let me at once dismiss that from his mind, and for the sake of his peace of mind, not only from his mind, but from his memory. Those days are not coming. The public debt is un from £ '600,000,000 to very nearlv £ 3,000,0^,000. I • ii, cd to make provision for something like £ 20,000,000 a year to ]) 'v the income on the Sinking Fund. Your rate of interest waa low. Kqw you have to mako provision for about £ 400,000.000 per year. That is perma- nent expenditure. You mav bring the Army and the flVV to the scale at which they were before. You may even reduce them, and still the expense would be greater. Why? The pay of thE I soldier is very much higher; the pay of the sailor is very much higher, and rightly -so. There is no "class of the community that more thoroughly deserves recognition and appreciation. In that respect the cc-t ot living has gone up like that of everybody else, and the cost of the Army, the Navy, and Air Force will be greater even at the same figure. HIGHER PAY. The same applies to education. If you leave education where it was—and ilein-eii forbid that we shouldthere is no worse economy for the country than that. It i- like the farmer who, to save his purse, does, not use fertilisers, for he will be in the bankruptcy court very soon. I see rates are going up, and, of course, that is the fault of the Government. May I just point out why they are gcitig upr Every official of the corporation has to get higher pay. I beg your pardon. Why should not thev have to live. Naturally, half-starved officials do not. give you much return any more than half-starved fields do. Your teachers, your police, and your work- men-all their pay is up, and the result is the rates are up because tile general cost oi living is up. The same thing will apply tc I the nonnal expenditure of the country—that ?j is permanent. 1 do not want you to allow yourselves to be persuaded by "stunt hunters into the belief that in a year or two you will get the expenditure of the country into the position it wao in before the war. OUR CIVILISING MISSION. Temporary expenditure is in the main due to the Army and the Navy. There are subwi- dies like the bread subsidy, the railway subsidy, and the coal subsidy. The bread subsidy must disappear soon. The railway subsidy is a. question purely of distributing it among the rates. There is only one treaty of any conse- quence which remains to be signed. That is Turkey. There is delay. It is attribut- able to the fact that you cannot settle the destiny of Turkey until it is known whether the United States of America is going to .siiar,&how shall I put it?—to share in the burden of civilisation o!;t-ide, tilt And, if his Excellency the United States Ambassador will not mind my saying so, 1 am rather glad that they have been brought face to face with it. There were people in the States who said: "Look at this great grabbing British Em- pire. Wherever they can get a piece of land, there it is." (Laughter.) Now, I think even these people, at least the majority, are realising that we are un- dertaking a great civilising duty at great cost to our own country. Until the United States makes up her mind we can't make the treaty, and the suspense in the settle- ment of tha Turkish question is attributable to that important postponement. I DEMOBBING. I make you a prophecy that by the end of the year 98 per cent, of the conscripted soldiers will have been returned to their homes. There arc many of them in Turkey and in other parts, not in Russia, so that by the time the Conscription Act has ex- pired there wiil not be a single conscript who will not have been returned, and the plodges that the Government gave at the last election in that respect will be redeemed in hha letter and in the spirit. Economy uioans cutting down of unneces- sary and unproductive expenditure. To cut down our reproductive expenditure i.- sham economy, is f-al.,e economy. In the housing tfCheme, in transport, in education, there you are impoverishing the country in- stead of enriching it by cutting down be- yond what is productive. The tusk of a Minister, and especially of a Prime jifcuisier, in these anxious days is a j trying one, and he needs all the help tnat his fellow-countrymen can give him "lest lie be overwhelmed with his responsibilities. The burden is heavy. It needs all the muscle, all the brain, it needs all the heart, it needs all the inspiration which is in a man, all the inspiration that he can get from his fellow-men, to enable him to get up and carry the weight. With all that help I trust to see the country overcome all I its difficulties.

BABIES AND SPIRITS

I WOMEN ATTACKED. I

I -LEAPS FOR LIFE. I

I" TO RIGHT THE WORLD. !

I LORD ASTOR .DEAD. J

I PAY IN THE CIVIL SERVICE.…

ISTAGE ROMANCE.I

[No title]

PETROGRAD.I

LORD PORTMAN DEAD. -I

A WHITEHALL SENSATION. I

BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY. J - I

LORD CLIFTON DIVORCED. I

"THOU SHALT NOT.".1

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WAR = MAKERS ON I TRIAL. i

I THE ASTOR ESTATES.I

IMALE CHAPERONS. I

F■■— I -EAT APPLES.I

fARE YOU SUPERSTITIOUS?-I

IIT'S A LONG WAY TO-I TIPPERRACHERRA.

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ESCORT GAGGED.

GHOST BILLIARDS. I

FAMOUS ACTOR DEAD. I

FATHER AT 16. I

.AEROPLANE ON TAXICAB. I

DECREE FOR A BARONET. I

8,000 A DAY. l

WHISKY PROFITEERING. I

STABLE LADS' STRIKE THREAT.…

BILLY WELLS. I

A GREAT WAR ON RATS. I

CHIEF OF INDIAN G.S. (

[No title]

I BETTER 'PHONES?

I ARE SPIRITUALISTS SANE?.

IDOWNING DISHES.

FROM GREECE TO SMOKE.

CONSTABLE SHOT.

[No title]

A TRICKSTER TRICKED. f

DIAMOND MYSTERY.I