Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

jt f' TO-DAY'S SHORT 3TORY.J…

For Women Folk.I

CARDIFF EMPIRE. I

A Lady - Terrorist I

A CARDIFF LADY VOCALIST. I

IPassing Pleasantries, I

I IN DEATH NOT DIVIDED.

I NEWPORT EMPIRE. j

I FOREICN, MAILS.I

; LOCAL TIDE TABLE I

Punished for Snoring 1

A TIN OF SALMON. I -I

ICRICKET !

I CWMAVON" TERRIERS" I 1 -!

I WORKING BY MUSIC I

! WINNER'S BRILLIANT PERFORMANCE

MONDAY'S RACING.

I -NOVEL USE OF DOUCHI

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I Billiards.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

I Billiards. 26.-CANN0NS OFF THE TOP CUSHION I fly RISO LZVI (CppyritM). In the position shown on Diagram- 594 the screw cannon off the cushion is best played by means of a half-ball contact, for it is much easier to ensure correct contact when using a half-ball stroke than when playing to take a ball thinner or fuller than half- bal'. In certain variations, given last week, of the position shown on Diagram 594 a ha-lf- ball stroke cannot be used, as such a stroke would throw the first object ball on to the second one. Diagram 595 illustrates such a position. Here, as a half-ball stroke would oause the red to hit the white, a somewhat thinner than half-ball stroke must be employed I Di.iuKAM 595.—A screw-cannon off the top cushion Red ball on til?- -spot. Red ball on the spot. Cue ball and object White both 2iin. from the red. All throe balls in a straight line. Unless the red be taken quite thinly it will kiss the object white for a cannon, off the cushion, and oonsider- ably more screw must be used to compensate for the thinner than half-ball contact with the red. In this stroke some check side- left-hand side in the diagram—may be advait- ta,goously used in order to cause the one bail to rebound more squarely from the cushion than it would do as the result of a plain-ball screw. Whereas, however, the half- ball screw cannon off the cushion illustrated on Diagram 594 is an ea?y enough stroke and quite within the compass of any mode- rate player when played in the manner already described, the thinner than half-ball screw cannon to avoid the kiss, as illustrated on Diagram 595, is a difficult stroke, and quite beyond the ordinary player. An alter- native strpke to this thinner than half-bali ecrew of the cushion is a. cannou off the top cushion, hitting the cushion first, but such & I stroke is also a. difficult one owing to the nicety of judgment required as to what point on the cushion to aim at. Other alternative strokes are a. steeplechase cannon, a masse cannon, or a pot, but all these strokes are extremely difficult. In the position shown on Diagrajn 594 the pot is also an alternative stroke to the cannon, but even this pot, whilst not as difficult as a pot with the balls sit uatoo as shown on Diagram 595, is any thing but an easy stroke to judge. Diagram 596 illustrates a position which is typical of positions which often occur. The; only stroke at all on is a cannon, but a ball- to-ball cannon is impossible by means of a medium-pace half-ball stroke even witb extreme running side. A ball-to-ball cannon is, however. an easy enough stroke when played as a forcing stroke, and this is the way the ordinary player plays it. Such a stroke, however, sends the balls flying all over I the table, and the player who plays the camion in tibia manner trusts to fortune for his next stroke. Instead of the cannon being played by means of a banging stroke it should be played off the top cushion, and not much more strength should be used than is necessary to cause the cue baJl to reach the second object ball. The moderate player, however, when playing this cannon off the top cushion generally plays it in the wrong way. The position illustrated on the dia- gram is such that not only is it impossible to cannon direct from one ball on to the other by means of a medium-pace half-ball stroke, but it is likewise impossible to get the cannon off the top cushion by means of a half-ball stroke without side. In fact, were the cannon to be attempted by the latter stroke, the cue ball's line of travel after its rebound from the top cushion would be quite wide of the red. The moderate player, recognising this quite easily, aims for a tliinuish contact with the first object, ball in order to prevent the cue ball going round the second object ball, and also with the Diagram 596.—A cannon off the top cushion. A half-ball stroke with plenty of check side. Red bail on the spot. Object white IQ& inches from the side cushion and 40 inches from the top cushion. Cue ball 17 inches from the side cushion and 53 inches from the baulk cushion. same end in view often plays the stroke with some check -side. As already explained, however, thinner than half-ball strokes played from a distance are always uncertain strokes owing to the difficulty that exists in taking- the object hall as desired, and the use of check side further complicates matters. In fact, should the cannon under discussion be ptayod as a thinner than half- ball stroke it is better to use no side and rely upon correct contact with the object ball. The most -reliable, and consequently the correct, way, however, of playing this cannon is by means of a medium-pace half- ball stroke with plenty of check side. With the balls placed to the measurements given under Diagram 596 a half-ball stroke will causc the cue-ball to strike the top cushion a,t a point, which is practically right behind the red—the exact point of contact with the cushion will vary slightly according to whether the stroke is played with ivory balls or with bonzoline balls—and strong check side will cause the cue ball to rebound from the cushion quite squarely on to the red— as shown by the continuous line on the diagram. Any fair player can be pretty certain of taking an object ball correctly when playing a half-ball stroke, whereas even really good players are often at fault when they have to use a thinner than half- ball stroke, consequently it is easy to under- stand why in the position shown on Diagram 596 the half-ball stroke with check side is much sounder than the thinner than half- ball stroke with or without check side. Of course, in strokes of the nature of the one under discussion, the amount of check side which must be used with a half-ball contact will not always be the same. but the necessary amount can always be gauged by calculating the point on the cushion upon which cue ball will impinge as the result of a, half-ball stroke. This half-ball stroke with check side can often be just as advan- tageously ufced for a cannon off the side cushion. Mr. Levi's articles appear every Saturday in the Evening Express," No. 1 of this series appeared on October 3.

1A Cardiff -0Docksman

TO-NIQHT'S TATTOO. I

:STOLL'S PANOPTICON, CARDIFF

I THE MOTOR CRAZE

I Carried Off in a MotorI

INEW THEATRE, CARDIFFI

ISEE PLOWDEN AND DIEI

iWORLD'S LONGEST BRIDGE I

I THE PALACE, CARDIFF

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