Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

..,.-I FIELD AND FARM. j

IGARDENING GOSSIP. I

- I A TELEPHONIC COMEDY.1

THE NEW CENTURY. I

LtJCK IN KLONDYKE. I

I "AGONY COLUMN" TRAGEDIES.…

[No title]

" THE LONG PULL." f

IMPENETRABLE ARMOUR.I

AGES OF CABINET MINISTERS.…

POTTO AT THE ZOO. I

A CELEBRATED MESMERIST.I

A MAN OF NO COUNTRY.I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

A MAN OF NO COUNTRY. Robbed of his nationality and disowned by the land of his birth, Christian Christiansson left Yar- mouth last week (says the JJaily Express) in his own vessel without the papers necessary to prevent his ship being summarily confiscated and he himself put in irons by the first man-of-war that hails him. Should anything of this sort happen him no nation will raise its voice upon his behalf, for, to use his own words, he is an outcast," a pariah among men, a man of no country. Christiansson a fortnight ago arrived in Yarmouth and bought the Alarm, a vessel formerly belonging to the now defunct Short Blue fleet, intending to refit her and convert her into a coasting trader. The new owner not being of British nationality Was, perforce, struck off the registers of this country, and subsequently, on Consular application for papers of registration under the flag of Sweden, of which he claims to be a subject, Christiansson made the startling discovery that neither he nor his ship can possess any nationality; both are pariahs. An Express representative met this unfortunate man on Yarmouth Quay-a sturdily-built man, dark complexioned, and with an intelligent, open face, upon which sunshine and storm had left their mark. In fluent English, and with that ingenuous air that characterises the man of travel, he told his story. He was born in Southern Sweden, and when a lad of 17 emigrated to New Zealand. He followed a seafaring life intermittently in the Far East for several years, during which time he obtained a master's certificate in the Norwegian merchant navy. Eventually, however, he settled down in the Colony, where he wooed fortune successfully. Naturalisation would have been comparatively aasy, but, as he had a desire to spend his latter days in the land of his birth, he neglected to take the necessary steps to become a subject of the Queen. He returned to Sweden after an absence of 21 years, and up to the present nothing has occurred to raise the question of his nationality. I am an outcast," he said bitterly. Sweden, the nountry of my birth-the land:of my fondest recollec- tions—will not own me. I am told I have been too long away. I could sail a Norwegian ship, and yet Norway refuses to recognise me as a subject, although she shows me more consideration than Sweden. "Yes. I'could be a subject of England—and proud I should be-but they tell me it means many for- malities and much money. "I had bought a cargo of herrings to freight my ship, as I expected no difficulty in registry, but as I belong to no country, nobody will grant me the necessary certificates of ownership that must be produced by all merchant ships clearing from any port for foreign parts; and I have been compelled to sell the cargo at a big loss. "I have been to London, where your Customs officials were very kind to me, but they could not help me. Every course shows breakers ahead. My only way to legally leave England is to sail as a fishing-boat, when I need not clear; and I have de- cided to do this, shaping a course for Norway, and, risking a challenge for my papers by a man-of-war, throw myself on the mercy of the Norwegian Govornment.1 It will be interesting to watch what treatment will be meted out to this victim of extraordinary expatria- tion in the Land of the Midnight Sun.

[No title]

"m....c THE WOMAN'S WORLD.