Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

24 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

I NEWS NOTES.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

I NEWS NOTES. THE long-fought for, the patiently waited for peaco proclamation has come at last. It came on Sunday evening to most of us, and the glad intelligence added yet another glorious First of June to our rough island story. The news was received in the main with quiet thankfulness rather than vociferous jubilation, and it is well. Britain has sustained a sanguinary and costly struggle for the upholding of the ideals of Right and Justice, buoyed by confidence in her integrity all along. Her endeavour is gained, 9 and we are glad, but we remember with sad- ness the many gallant fellows who have in the prolonged campaign the grave of heroes, and our eyes grew dim in the retrospect. MANY a gallant burgher, too, lies low under the veldt, slain in pursuing the forlorn hope uf a reconstitution of the unsympathetic Boor ascendancy in South Africa. Hundreds and thousands of the Transvaalers and men of the Orange State perished fighting bravely for the cause of their compatriots, a cause which they ignorantly believed to be rightful. Honour to them, but tenderer honour to Britain's noble dead. Twenty one thousand odd of all ranks have died for the Empire, and hearts are :aching everywhere for each and all of them. Types-because per- sonally best known-of the fallen brave of Britain, are General Penn Symons, who fell at Dundee in the early days of the war; Com- mander Egerton, of the Powerful, who died grandly at Ladysmith; Keith Falconer, slain on the Orange River; General Wauchope, the idol of the Black Watch," done to death at Magersfontein; the Marquis of Winchester, major in the Guards; Lord Roberts's only boy, killed while valorously sticking to his guns at the Tugela; Colonel Dick-Cunyngham, of the Gordons; General Woodgate, sacrificed at Spion Kop the bonnie Earl of Airlie, who died at Pretoria Captain Lord Kensington; Colonel Vandaleu of the Irish Guards Prince Christian Victor; Colonel Le Gallais, of the Hussars; Lord O'Hagan, lieutenant of the Grenadiers, who met his death at Springfou- tein. A splendid lot they were, the pity of it that they should have to yield their lives for the cause. THE heroes have not died in vain. On the bones of the English the English flag is stayed." A lasting peace with honour will result from this red war, and South Africa will surely prosper under the righteous rule to be now established. The war has lasted through thirty-one long months, many of them full of anxiety for the combatants. Apart from the ever deplorable, never recoverable life loss, the campaign has cost us as much as a couple of years' revenue, or there- abouts of the United Kingdom. That will come back again through trade channels, and the world be the wealthier for the struggle but the blood of the brave is spilt for ever, and the tears of the weeping will flow on, though they be proud at heart of those they have loved and lost for Britain. BUT the hard fighting has broadened the Empire, extended its bounds, and knit in far closer unison the Colonies everywhere, an achievement that could scarcely have been compassed at lighter cost; especially when one remembers how an envious world has had to look uninterferingly on and admire Britain's magnificent cohesion and resourcefulness. It took us longer to convince the stubborn Boer that he was beaten than it did to demonstrate to the nations that we should see our trouble through and brook no intervention. But all that is past, and we hope that smiling Peace will soon be with plenty crowned and all the earth the better. WE consider ourselves a calculating people, but we were more than a little out in our reckoning over this great war. At first w o thought it might cost ten millions, and this was to be met by an issue of Treasury bills to the amount of P,8,000,000 and by the surplus of £3,000,000 for the year 1899-1900, thus giving a small margin. This estimate was placed before the House of Commons in the autumn of 1899. It was anticipated that the struggle would be over in four months. Actually the cost has been £ 23,217,000 in 1899-1900; E68,620,000 in 1900-1; k73,197,000 in 1901-2; while in the present year £63,950,000 has been voted for war expenditure. This sum allows for the maintenance of our present force in South Africa for eight or nine months, according to the Chancellor of the Exchequer's speech when introducing the Budget at a cost of £ 5,000,000 a month, or P,1,250,000 a week. The vote for this year, however, makes no allowance for gratuities to the troops or for the transport of the forces home, and should the war be further protracted in the guerilla sense by resistance on the part of any of the commandoes, these charges would have to be added. As the vote stands the war will have cost just about Z222,974,000, or twenty-two times the original estimated cost. It may be remembered that the cost of the Crimean War was only C70,000,000 in money, but then at that date we did not feed, house, and maintain in luxury the rela- tives, wives, and familiss of our enemies. THE cost of the fighting has been paid F-r from taxation to the extent of k73,81116,000, while £ 149,138,000 has been borrowed. This brings the National Debt to k786,000,000, which is much less than the figure at which it stood after the Crimean War. And we may get a re- mission of certain of the latest financial burdens now that a pacific agreement has been arrived at. IT is such a long way back to the llast7 peaco of any magnitude affecting us closely that one has to go hunting up precedents to see how 'it was publicly celebrated. On March 31, 1856, it was known in London that the Crimean war was at an end, and that the plenipotentiaries in Paris had signed a peace treaty. The then Lord Mayor read the news in front of the London Mansion House and at the Royal Exchange, amid much waving of hats and handkerchiefs. Flags were flown and guns fired at the Tower. It was not until some time later that public rejoicings on a large iscalo could be arranged. At length it was an- nounced that the Government was or- ganising public celebrations of great mag- nificence. Woolwich Arsenal was devoted for some time to the manufacture of fireworks, and in the Green-, ark, Hyde-park, and Victoria- park buildings 200ft. long were erected for the storage of the fireworks. Nearly £ 20,000 worth of gunpowder was expended, and the Govern- ment officials proved that if the proper organi- sation of the War Office was beyond them, they could at any rate manage a firework display fairly well. We shall see what will happen now. but the oncoming of the Coronation clearly points to the probable celebration of a dual I joyful event.

I POISON CASE IN SUSSEX.'…

f THE ETON WAR MEMORIAL.

A WOLF'S EYE OPERATED ON.

TOvVN TOPICS.

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' THE BOUNDARIES OF BAROTSELAND.

CHEAP DIAMONDS.

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PEACE SIGN ED. I

I A NEW RAND.Ii

I THE CAPE AND THE CONSTITUTION.…

, A NOYEL EDUCATION QUESTION.

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SUPERSTITIONASANOPIU31 I SUPERSTITION…

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I KING'S CORONATION PROCESSION.

THE REVENUE. I

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I-I MANIA IN TROMBONES.

! BATTLESHIPS' ARMOUR.

I NEGLECTED FOR YEARS._