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15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

INEWS NOTES.I

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NEWS NOTES. By the lamented demise of Lord Salisbury, a great Englishman has passed away. The noble marquis had finished his life work in statesmanship, after an exceptionally prolonged period of arduous service to his country, and was spending the residue of his days at the fine old ancestral demesne of the Cecils, Hat- field, in scientific and literary leisure. Lat- terly, and especially since the death of Lady Salisbury-who had been to his lordship a help- meet and companion indeed—the aged states- man had failed in health sadly, and those who were close to him became very anxious, espe- cially as a sojourn at his chalet in France did not have its customary recuperative effect. Gradually the ex-Premier got worse, despite the careful nursing of his devoted daughter, the Lady Gwendolen Cecil, and the care of his medical and other attendants; and he passed peacefully away on Saturday evening. By a pathetic coincidence, while Lord Salis- bury was drawing towards his last breath in Hatfield House, his half sister, Lady Galloway, was being interred in the private cemetery of the Cecils in connection with the adjacent church. And his lordship's death took place on the actual fiftieth anniversary of his first return to Parliament, in which he later took so prominent a place. As Lord Robert Cecil he was chosen member for Stamford as far back as August 22nd, 1853. He was a vigorous politician, serious and often caustic in debate, but his high abilities and lofty principles pro- cured him the esteem of those with whom he came in contact, equally with the admiration of his own followers. When Lord Salisbury's most illustrious antagonist as to the methods of conducting our national affairs passed away, the lord of Hatfield said, with the sinerest ap- preciation and sorrow of Mr. Gladstone: "He was a great Christian gentleman." The remark applies with striking actuality to Lord Salis- bury himself. Well for Britain that this can be written of her leading statesmen. It is recalled that Lord Salisbury bore some striking personal resemblances to his foregoer the Elizabethan Cecil. My Lord of Burleigh, ye be burly," was Elizabeth's punning com- ment of some blunt speech or her Minister's, and of the late Lord Salisbury's disregard of ceremony there are many instances. A curious shyness and avoidance of recognition marked the old age of William Cecil, who was given to roaming about in the neighbourhood of his Strand mansion. The late marquis in. his hygienic walks abroad showed the same tem- perament. He hated recognition, and if saluted in the street touched his hat and hur- ried off with obvious shyness and discomfiture. And yet to his real intimates he was a charm- ing man. — Lord Salisbury did not care very much for the praise or the blame of any one, but always went his own convinced way, confident that his judgment was sound and his aim for the right. It is nice now to see in the hour and Article of his death a general recognition of so eminent a statesman's ability and integrity, both here and abroad. His Majesty the King in the message of condolence sent to the be- reaved family at Hatfield, voiced the feeling of those who have watched the late Marquis most closely in opposition or on his own side, when "he profoundly regretted the death of one whose invaluable services will ever dwell in the memory of his fellow countrymen." In chemical and electrical experimentation Lord Salisbury spent as much time as he could spare at Hatfield; and he would have made a very successful analytical chemist. It is not unlikely that Lord Salisbury's penchant for the laboratory may have received an impetus from his early friendship with one of the most de- voted men of science of his day, the late Sir Henry Acland. When Lord Robert Cecil was at Christchurch his health was so delicate as to forbid his joining in the sports which make up so large a part of the undergraduate life, and even to stand in the way of his working really hard as a student. Acland was his medi- cal adviser at Oxford; and Lord Salisbury afterwards declared that he owed his life to Acland's advice to try the effect of travel and sea-air. It is probable, too, that the strong influence and encouragement of Acland nerved him to the apparently hopeless effort to fight down the ill-health with which he had been afflicted from childhood. He got through a tremendous lot of work of many sorts and in numerous ways. One trait for which Lord Salisbury was noted was his desire to do all things pertaining to his position personally as much as possible, so keeping touch with every movement in which he was engaged. Considerable disappointment was expressed at the decisive way in which the American yacht "Reliance" outsailed Sir Thomas Lip- ton's Shamrock III. in the first of the races for the America Cup carried to a conclusion. It appears that the atmospheric conditions of Saturday last were almost perfect, and that the surroudings were just as though made for the Shamrock. The wind blew with a force which was variously estimated as being from eight to twelve miles to the hour, and this, it was claimed, was exactly what Sir Thomas Lipton and his confreres were most anxious for. To be beaten under such circumstances as these was exasperating indeed. With regard to the new postal-orders now on sale, it is claimed by a critic that they dis- play no very great improvement upon what went before. A slip, printed with the number and amount, is provided for the sender to re- tain, and to fill up with the name and date if he wishes, but as all careful people in the past took a note of number and amount before dispatch- ing a postal-order this will not benefit" them and the others will throw the slip away or lose it—a fate for which its size makes it peculiarly fitted. The slip is, of course, in no sense a re- ceipt, and the Postmaster-General—in a new regulation printed on the back-declares that after this order has been paid-to whomsoever it is paid-the Postmas ter- General will not be liable for any further claim in respect of this order." In no case either may the order be paid after the expiration of six months from the last day of the month of issue until reference has been made to the chief office in London- another new regulation which does not appear, on the surface, to improve the position of the owner. Perhaps, after some skirmishing some better regulations may later on be devised.

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1-I DEATH OFi Lord Salisbury.…

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