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 UNI VERSIT Y COLLEGE, ABERYSTWITH.I…

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 UNI VERSIT Y COLLEGE,  ABERYSTWITH. « MEETING- OF THE COURT OF I GOVERNORS AT LLANELLY. AN INTERESTING RETROSPECT BY THE PRINCIPAL. The half yearly meeting of the Court ef Governors of the University College of Wales, Aberystwith, was held at the Town Hall, Llanelly, on Friday last. In the absence of Lord Rendel, the Venerable Archdeacon Griffiths, of Llandaff, was votle(I to the chair, on the initiative of Principal Roberts. He was supported by the Principal, and the Registrar (Rev. T. Mortimer Green), and the other governors present were: Miss Ada Thomas,Sir J. Hills-Johnes, Sir Marteine Lloyd, Professor J. Brough, Dr. E. Evans, Revs. J. Austin Jenkins, Cardiff, H. Elvet Lewis, Llewellyn Edwards, Messrs. H. C. Fryer, E. Trubshaw, I-I. Herbert, Brynmalas, Ammanford, J, Alan Murray, Aberysfcwitb, J. Thomas, Bryn- dawr, C. M. Williams, Joseph Thomas, Lewis James, J. Thomas M. Lumbley Davies, D. C. Roberts, J. H. Davies, and T. Thomas. NON-ATTENDANCE. I The Registrar read letters of apology for non- attendance from Lord Rendel, Mr. L. J. Roberts, H.M.I., Miss E. P. Hughes (Cambridge), Mr. Humphreys-Owen. M.P., Sir Edward Davies, the Lord Mayor of Manchester, Lord Henry Vane Tempest, and others. AX BISECTION FORMULA. I Mr. Alan Murray asked it it was not usual for the result of the various elections conducted by the Court to be declared at the conclusion of the meetings. The Registrar replied that the proceedings of the last Court were unduly extended, and when the casting of the votes had been completed the Court had risen. Mr. Alan Murray asked why, as Miss Bell had received the required number of votes for the Council, she had not been declared elected. The Registrar stated that although Miss Bell had received the required number of votes it was necessary that candidates for the Council should be nominated by the governors. In this respect Miss Bell's nomination was faulty and she could | uot, therefore, be declared elected. I THE COURT OF THE UNIVERSITY. I Mr. Fryer proposed the re-election of the follow- I ing as representatives of the College on the Court of the University College of Wales :—Lord Rendel, Lieutenant-General Sir James Kills-Johnes, G.C.B., V.C., Dr. Edward Jones, Dolgelly, and Rev. T. Mortimer Green. Sir Marteine Lloyd seconded, and it was unani- mously carried. RETROSPECT AND OUTLOOK. Principal Roberts was then called upon to Submit a statement with special reference to the present session as marking the close of the first carter of a century since the College was founded. In his prefatory remarks Principal Roberts made <\11 appropriate reference to his predecessor in the Principalship, Dr. Edwards, who had occupied the Position of principal for 19 years out of the 25 of the existence of the College. They were proud of 1)1'. Edwards as a distinguished scholar and as a leader in the higher walk of the nation's life. In order to commemorate Dr. Edwards' connection I with the college it had been decided, as they were ?ware, to open a Portrait Fund, aud he had pleasure ¡n stating that the arrangements were now nearly Completed, and that the presentation would shortly ?e made. This was only a slight and very 111adequate expression of the debt that the College oWed to him for his heroic courage in times past in van ring the interests of higher education in Wales. rincipal Roberts proceeded to state that the berystwYth College was the first established in Wales for the purpose of imparting university Education to all classes, irrespective of sect and class. It had been in existence for 25 years, which, Perhaps, was not a long time, but all our national "latitutions were comparatively young and begin- ning their life. During that period about 1,500 students had passed through the College, and it I lxught not be without interest to give the governors Present some idea of the car eers of the students lfter completing their educational course. In this Connection he had been impressed with one fact, amely, how long a time it took for students, in certain professions especially, to enter into their Practical work in life. He would first of all ?mmarise the academic records. In relation to I ? University of London, the only university in ?cb students of the college could graduate ?"ile at Aberystwyth, 361 students had matricu- td, and of these 171 had graduated in arts, and v* In science. Of the total number of graduates a ery large proportion had passed with honours. t e 171 graduates in arts, 54 had obtained incurs and of the 39 in science, 23 had obtained honours. Case after case had occurred in which U^GntS the College, in competition with stMents from other colleges, had obtained the bigilest position in the honour's listpf the London t ^"ersitv. Sixteen former students proceeded to the higher degree of M.A., and 3 to that of (,oetor of science. In the same university 17 "Udents had graduated as bachelors of medicine, With first-class honours 7 bad become doctors _t medicine. 2 with gold medals 8 had become ?ehelors of surgery, and one a master of surgery jth a gold medal. In Oxford 44 former students ?graduated, 16 with first-class honours and 19 ?h second-class honours, and one had become .?ctor of medicine. At Cambridge the number :ts considerably less. Twenty had graduated, 5 lth first-class honours, and 4 with second-class 110¡;OUl's. -^teen had graduated in arts at Edin- bu-i and 7 at Glasgow, and one at each university ? ?. doctor of medicine. Three students had th:duated as Ph.D. at foreign universities. As to tlvi" ^areers of the students, 222 had become ? "a- sters of religion, not including 10 who had > 0rn° foreign missionaries. Of the 222, 49 had hen clergymen of the Established Church, a?? Nonconformist ministers. Of the 10  th f' ?i -??es, one was the son of the senior vice- Tj-p ?11 of the College, the Lord Mayor of ?Mhester. About 400 students had l) £ '.c °me various grades; 3 in theological "Ile es, 3 inspectors of schools, 25 headmasters or ^ea ?stresses of secondary schools, and 234 as*i-t masters or mistresses in secondary schools, head or assistant teachers in elementary Scho ? these, 105 had been sent out since the '?lisllri t of the day training department for  teachers in 1892. Among the former "? working as elementary teachers one '?th ? ?°? distinguished, a woman, who held the <?. ? doctor of science, had elected to act as an UssW? ^t Stress under the London School Board ?? t,hu"?ustratingthe change of attitude on the pa ^onl\fndents to the great possibilitites which ?on S?d to the profession of elementary teacher, and iti ??cated the fact that we were arriving :m)j??y??solida.rity of thecalling of teachers in ?1 d- ??"s- Three former students were now well- !?Q b_rades. Three former students were now well- ku0n-, lnem^crs of Parliament. Eleven had become 33 solicitors, and 82 had qualified as '?''Hc ? Petitioners. Fifty-nine had entered various depp,.men'S business life. Twenty-two had ?.0? ??srs, and 25 teachers of music. Twelve ?I-le Journahsts. Very few had entered the ciy? SeIT7 A considerable number were now no ?ore Ut ^ose remaining were still at work in ?°? remaining were still at work in ?].-ions ?, '?'ss, assisted not only by the ordinary educa.t?; ??" ?qulpment which the college had helped th e rn to ??' but by the ideas and ideals which nn'vei-J7 college life was bound to form. He taoke<j or_ war^ to the next generation of work Av^h <s(-r ? eonf^ence and faith, which had been lll(,ch piw what bad taken place a,t the bad taken place at the r^etiocr the Council that morning. The Council decirl L^ ?t? proceed with the completion of the c°lieo'e v 111ldngs. ?'? one point of view, the '?Pictio # ?s college buildings might be ol eci as ?? secondary importance compared ^'th IJut. soul of the work carried on. I,, in th e present instance, it happened that the accommodation which the extensions would provide was closely bound up with eflicient work. It had been most strongly urged upon them by those who were competent to speak, that there was deep need for the extension of the .scientific department of the college, in order to enable the college authorities to successfully cope with the demands made upon them, especially in view of the significant fact that the college was now a con- stituent of the university of Wales. It was pro- posed to extend the physical, the biological and the agricultural departments. Towards this there was the Government grant of £ 10,000, together with £ 5,700 by public subscription. It had been thought that these sums would have sufficed for the purpose without incurring any debt. However, after an examination of the tenders received, it had been found that the work could not be completed with- out an additional expenditure of about £ 5,000. The Council had decided to go on with the com- pletion of the buildings and to trust to the public for the funds necessary for the work. An ap- peal had already been made to the public for a fund to cover the interest on the money, and P.200 a year had been promised for three years, very largely owing to the generous help of Sir Edward Davies, Llandinam, who had promised to subscribe £ 50 per annum for five years. Another great need of the college was the establishment of departmental libraries for special- ized study. They should aim at making the training not only one for tli3 acquisition of knowledge, but for research and investigation, and for increasing knowledge training that would enable Welsh students, without leaving their own country, to become specialised students. A gentle- man, who was not a Welshman, but took much interest in Welsh education, Mr. Henry Tate, had for providing books for a science section, and from another source had come F-100 for the provision of books in certain departments on the arts side. Very great liberality had been shewn towards the college in the past, £ 100,000 having been subscribed since its foundation. Unfortun- ately, however, little of that sum was still left, owing to the fact that much had been required for the maintenance of the work of the college from year to year. Great liberality was shewn to the cause of education nowadays, and in this respect he did not believe that the Welsh people tvould be found wanting. More important even than the financial situation was the call which this college made, and which the University of Wales made, that the flower of the Welsh youth should be entrusted to the institutions in Wales, to be trained for the work of life. However much might have been done in the past, he predicted that infinitely more would be done ifi the next 20 years if the Welsh people, without distinction of class or creed, would send their sons and daughters to the higher institutions which Wales now possessed for herself (applause). Sir James Hillls-Johnes moved the following resolution:—" This this Court, having heard the statement of the Principal, respecting the work accomplished by the College during the 25 years of its history, learns with much gratification that the Council have manifested their firm confidence in the future of the College by deciding to proceed immediately with the completion of the buildings, and pledges itself to do its utmost in paying off the debt thereby created." Mr. Fryer seconded this in a very telling speech. Dr. E. Evans supported the resolution, remarking that as an old science student at Aberystwyth, he fully appreciated the need of extending the labora- tories. In 1875, when he was at the College, there were practically no laboratories of any kind. Since then very good laboratories had been opened, but he agreed that there was need for extension, as there could be no doubt that science students at Aberystwyth had been handicapped in competition with students from other colleges more efficiently equipped. Sir Marteine Lloyd spoke to the resolution, re- ferring in particular to the agricultural depart- ment of the college. The Chairman also supported the resolution, and gave some most interesting reminiscences of the early days of the college. The resolution was put to the meeting and unanimously passed. The Principal moved a vote of thanks to the ¡ Llanelly Borough Council for the use of the room. Rev. Lewis James (Narberth) seconded, remark- ing that the chamber, excepting the library at the college, was the finest in which the governors had ever assembled. The motion was carried. The proceedings closed with a vote of thanks to the chairman, passed on the initiative of the Rev. Elvet Lewis. PRINCIPAL EDWARDS'S PORTRAIT FUND. It was reported that the above fund had now reached JE116. Principal Roberts intimated that. it would be closed as soon as possible, so that intending subscribers had better lose no time.

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