Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

CIVILIAN SERVICE IN WAR TIME.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

CIVILIAN SERVICE IN WAR TIME. There is abiding inspiration in the noble wQrá6 of one of our greatest statesmen of t':1e past, that England, in a time of crisis, fiav-r^ herself by her own exertions and Europe hy- her example. A 6evere crisis is agaip upon us, and tho duty is more incum- bent than ever. Not less gratifying and enccuraging is the fact that the perform: of duty ,ill, according to all human calculation, eventuate even in a greater ser- vice to the future of civilisation of the world than our forefathers achieved by the admir- uble exertions which history places to their cr-edit. Looking back along the stirring events of our nearly three years' war, the British people, *.ve venture to think, have a record of which we may be justifiably proud. N'Ve have turned ourselves from a nen-mili- tpry nation into one of the first-class mili- tary powers of the world, and there is no competent authority that does not admit the Magnificent quality of our new Army forma- tions. Sea-power, we know, has been our heritage for many generations, but never has our "unchallengeable Navy" exerted a Heater pressure than against the German fleet by which the Kaiser hoped to wrest the trident out of our grasp. Not only have we Produced an Army of nearly five millions of excellent soldiers a;:d have strengthened the Navy beyond tile utmost hopes of the most sanguine sailor, but we have turned the great producing ccntres cf our peace industries to the production of war-like machinery with a thoroughness and speed which has resulted in giving us a vast superiority over an enemy who had been organising war for more than forty years. It is, indeed., by comparing the actual achievements of the British people during the last t.ro years and a half with the finished. rcduct of the greatest military nation of the world, with all its boasted genius for organisation applied to a con- genial task for forty years, that the "Old Country" is found completely absolved from -■ charges of inefficiency and decadence once So common in t'i.j mouths of our traducers. The changes in our habits of thought and political action have been no less marvellous. All the old "party games' have been put on one side; private property and private con- cerns ave been cheerfully surrendered and Put under Government control; the working Wen have suspended all the trade union pri- vileges which they had won after a hard- fought fight; we have come to regard "Com- pulsion" as a principle of high value. The safety of the State has, indeed, become the supreme law. In comparison with these large changes the exertions we have made in raising funds for the war take, perhaps, a lower place, but even here the calculations of even the most optimistic financiers have been exceeded by what this nation has actu- ally accomplish*. and our credit still stands ^igh in all the markets cf the world. It is not necessary to pursue this matter. Far ]):}or,. important is it to bring- ourselves as a people face to face with the stern fact that although wo have indeed done wonders we must 6till do more in order to make victory ours This is the fact that our responsible headers are pressing upon us in this week ^hioh is dedicated to the cause of National Service. The demands of the war are of tuch magnitude that all the available labour of the country has to be strictly organised artd economised in order that the efficiency ()f our essential industries may be main- tained. Fairly considered, the conditions of national Service as et forth by Mr Neville Chamberlain in the early part of this week entail no real hardship upon anybody. Every capable man in the country is under an honourable obligation to become a volunteer for National Service; if he is required, the ?t? and conditions of service are euch as 1 Hot put him to any considerable eacri- "cc. Without a large supply of men ready to undertake essentia' work, there is not only a danger that our military efficiency will Buffer, bat there is even the danger that the whole country will be reduced to a state of fcubmis^ion by actual want. It is unthink- able that we shall loss the war and all the sacrifices already made by us and our Allies for the lack of civilian labour; it is quite as "unthinkable that Britons, realising the necee- sity, will fail in the hour of their country's Heed.

THE CHURCH IN WALES.

NOTES OF -THE -WEEK.-

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IMR FREDERICK SALIS SCHWA…

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