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BAZAAR AND FETE AT I FRODSHAM.

Rhestrau Manwl, Canlyniadau a Chanllawiau
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

BAZAAR AND FETE AT I FRODSHAM. MR. TOLLEMACHE, M.P., AND THE KING'S I OATH. On Wednesday and Thursday the long-antici- pated grand bazaar and garden fete, in aid of the fund for providing the stipend of a curate for a poor district in the parish, took place in the beautiful grounds belonging to Miss Hayes. The weather being beautifully sunny, a large number of people assembled at the time of opening, and the scene, with the great variety of coloured dresses and the prettily laid out flower beds, was magnificent in the extreme. Among those present at the opening were the following:—Rev. Dr. W. H. L. Cogswell (vicar of Wallasey), Mrs. B. C. Roberts (Chester), Mr. and Miss Jayne (The Palace, Chester), Mrs. Gibbons Frost (Chester), the Misses Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Timmins, the Misses Hitchen, Mrs. and the Misses Bowden, Mr. T. Lewis, Rev. H. B. and Mrs. Blogg, Rev. R. W. Colston, Mrs. and Miss Blain (Bunbury), Mr. P. and Miss Speakman, Mrs. and Miss Mortimer, Mr- W. Mortimer, Mr. and Mrs. A. Thomas (Hemp Gill), Rev. W. H. Stables, Mrs. J. Ockleston, Mrs. J. Crosfield, Mr. and Mrs. Tiley, Mr. and Mrs. Diggle, Mrs. E. Ashworth, Miss Simpson, Mrs. H. Davies, Miss Hazlehurst, Mr. C. Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. Howard, Mrs. and the Misses Garratt, Miss Weaver, Mr. and Mrs. J. Murray, Mr. and Mrs. J. Parkinson, Mrs. and Miss Lewis, Mrs. and the Misses Ricketts, Mrs. Hutchings, Miss Hart Davies, Mrs. Spencer, Mrs. H. Linaker, Miss Garnett, Rev. E. S. Jermyn, Miss Pollard, Mr. and the Misses Gorst, Rev. W. McKee, and Miss Laycock. The Vicar (the Rev. H. B. Blogg, M.A.), pro- posed a hearty vote of thanks to Miss Hayes for her great kindness in lending her beautiful grounds for the occasion, also to all the people in the parish for their hearty and ready zeal in pro- moting the welfare of the bazaar. He then called on Mr. H. J. Tollemache, M.P., to declare the proceedings open. Mr. Tollemache said: I am very glad to be able to come down to assist at the opening of your bazaar, and I hope with all my heart that it will be a success. Mr. Blogg has told me of the object of your bazaar, which is to obtain sufficient funds to enable him to utilise the services of another curate in this large and growing neighbourhood. That is a most excellent object. We know very well that Frodsham, like many other places, is growing. We look around here and see chimneys smoking, and hear the whistle of railway engines and steamers on the Ship Canal, and we all know that that means increasing trade, increasing in- dustries, increasing population, and increased necessities, and where this exists no one can afford to stand still. The Church of England and other similar agencies for the spread of religion in our great centres of population cannot afford to stand still; therefore it was that they welcomed any effort on the part of the ministry to try to do their duty to their own satisfaction and that of their brethren. He hoped their efforts would be successful, and that they might be able to do considerable work in stimulating the efforts of the clergy, and inculcating in those growing districts the principles of Christian faith, hope and charity upon which our common religion depends. (Hear, hear.) Mr. Tollemache pro- ceeded to say that it would perhaps be more prudent for him to stop now, but having spoken of those principles, might he be permitted to speak on a subject that was of peculiar interest, and which was exercising the minds of a great many people just now, and on which he had re- ceived dozens of communications from the Frod- sham district, viz., the declaration which the monarch of this kingdom had to make on his accession to the throne. It was a declaration in which he was compelled to speak of the Roman Catholic religion as superstitious and idolatrous. He did feel that in discussing a thing of this sort he would like to appeal to those sentiments of Christian faith, hope and charity. If they had any influence-his own interest was centred in one vote, and he had decided on his own course- his advice was that they must lay down in as strong and in as uncompromising manner as they could that under no conceivable circdmstances would they tolerate that the Monarch of this country should be anything but a member of the Protestant faith. (Hear, hear, and applause.) But having laid that down as strong as they could, let them put it in language that was not offensive to those with whom they might differ on some point of religious doctrine, but with whom they were in perfect sympathy on other subjects. He would give them one or two illus- trations. Take the case of the Duke of Norfolk, the head Roman Catholic layman in this country, a nobleman who was respected in many walks of life, who sacrificed ease and comfort, and on the outbreak of the war went out to South Africa to fight for his Queen and country. (Ap- plause.) Why should they be compelled to stand by and hear their deepest religious sentiments described as idolatrous. Take also the case of Sir Wilfred Laurier, Premier of Canada, a French- man and Roman Catholic, who had done more to support the loyal feeling of that country than any man in the world. Why should it be necessary to hear the King describing his religion as super- stitious and idolatrous? If his remarks carried any weight, did they not think it would be a prudent and Christian line to take, that while they laid it down that they would not tolerate the election of a Roman Catholic to the Monarchy, they might do it in language that did not offend the susceptibilities of others? Mr Tollemache then proceeded to describe the growth of populous centres, and instanced the case of an old farm which was granted for the support of a church which was now in the heart of New York, and Trinity Church, Broadway, now drew a rental of P,2,000,000 a year from it. That ought to gladden Mr. Blogg's heart in case there was any such prospect in store for him. He then declared the bazaar open. The proceedings once opened, a brisk sale was effected in the large tent, where the several stalls were most effectively decorated. The stallholders and workers were as follows: — Church-street Stall (Marguerites) Mrs. Hurst, Mrs. Barton, Mrs. R. Holland, Mrs. Chorlton, the Misses Mallinson, R. V. Mallinson, Ashton, Chorlton, D. Chorlton, Hitchen, L. Hitchen, Hazlehurst, Phyllis Hurst and Ada Fleming, Mrs. H. Linaker, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Downes Massie, Mrs. Diggle, Mrs. Christian, Mrs. Kydd, Mrs. Scott, the Misses Richardson (3) and E. Holland, Miss Selby, Mrs. Edwards, the Misses Garnett, M. Heywood, Linaker, A. Linaker and Edwards. Main-street Stall (Cornflower) Mrs. Illidge, Mesdames Barrow, Spencer, Holland, A. Jones, Burrows, Riley, Hibbertt, Robinson, Kirkham, Davies, Dean, McWhannell, Hancock, the Misses Percival, Rogers and Nield. Netherton Stall (Sweet Peas): Mrs. Thomas, Mesdames Mortimer, Speakman, J. Crosfield, Timmins, Charley P. Mortimer, Cnarles Linaker' jun., and Miss A. Ashton. Overton Stall (Nasturtiums): Mrs. Charles Reynolds, Mrs. Occleston, Mrs. W. Hutchings and Miss Blain. Vicarage Stall (Roses): Mrs. Blogg, Mrs Milner, Mesdames J. H. Davies, Diggle, Howard Childe, Miss Davies, the Misses Fletcher, Miss Heywood, Miss Tiley and Miss Woods. Refreshment Stall: Miss Linaker. Mesdames Kydd, Downes, Massie, Misses B. Richardson, E. Holland, H. Linaker, M. Aston, Edwards, Wilkin- son, C. Linaker (Blackburn), Smith (Preston), Mrs. Johnson ((St. Helens). Dairy Stall (Buttercups): Miss Speakman and Miss Mortimer. A great feature of the first afternoon s pro- ceedings was the "Royal" Procession and Corona. tion on the green by the younger children of the various schools in the neighbourhood, under the superintendence of Miss Harrison and her teachers. The characters represented included policemen, sixteen Maypole girls, Earl Roberts, Baden-Powell, six soldiers, naval captain and ten sailors, fairy queen, May Queen (1901), two grannies, Jack and Jill, Bo-peep and Red Riding Hood, rose queen, three fuchsias, gypsy queen and suite, heralds, beef-eaters, crown bearers, sceptre bearers, courtiers, king and queen, pages, maids of honour and lady-in-waiting, Britannia, butter- cups and judges. This was beautifully done and enthusiastically cheered. After the stately crown- ing ceremony, a pretty drill by maids of honour and gypsies took place, also a dance, "Sir Roger de Coverley," by children in character. Both performances reflected great credit on the children and their indefatigable teachers. The Maypole dance by the juveniles was also very pretty, and greatly admired. At various intervals during the day concerts and entertainments took place in Miss Hayes's drawing-room and marquee by the boys of the Overton Grammar School. There were action songs (conducted by Mr. Caruth, Mr. Hutton, and Mr. Hibbertt), selections by the Frodsham Bridge mission choir (Mr. P. Jones), girls' entertainments (conducted by Miss Roberts and the assistant teachers) and early Victorian concerts, under the management of -Nliss Lewis aid i,? r! enient of Miss B. Lewis. Miss Lewis and Mr. Hibbertt accompanied, The Aston and Preston Brook Brass Band was in attendance. The prize for the best decorated tea table was won by Miss Edwards with 25 votes, while the prize in an awards W^'FJ? lorin tea" competition was awarded to Mr. H. P. Mortimer and Miss Beatrice Garratt. The management of the bazaar was in the hands ol an executive and general committee, with the vicar as chairman, and these gentlemen are to be congratulated on the success of the under- taking. On Thursday the proceedings were opened by Mrs. F. Hayes, of Ashton Hayes.

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