Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

RURAL LIFE. BY A SON OF THE SOIL. A NEW HANDYMAN'S TOOL. The hint of which I give an illustration is so ingenious and yet so simple that it is marvel- lous one has never heard of it being put to prac- tical use before. It is another idea for which I am indebted to our ingenious American cousins. The device must, of course, be carefully made, and then it will enable one with accuracy to de- termine the centres of round bars, discs, and, in fact, any object of a oircular form. A piece of square brass rod about eight inches long is bent to form approximately a right angle. both legs being of equal length. A strip cf brass (A) is soldered to the ends of the legs. Equidistant be- tween points X Y make a mark B. Another brass strip B of same size as A is soldered in place as shewn, being careful to have edge C exactly on the line B and over the angle D. Fig. 2 shews TO FIND CEXTRES IN EORJTD WOTI. tnefhod of using the devicc. Simply place it on the end of the bar or shaft; make a mark with scratch awl; give a quarter turn, and make an- other mark. The intersection of tne lines will give the exact centre. THE DOG LICENCE. Though the reminder is late, care should be taken to see the law on dogs is obeyed to the letter. A good many people are under the im- pression that a licence is transferable, but this is quite a misconception, as the Chancellor of the Exchequer recently explained in the House of Commons. No rnattor what time of the year a dog comes into hIS master's possession, he must pay the tax, which only franks him up to De- cember 31st of each year. Even if one keeps a dog for another person, a writer in the Daily Telegraph says, it is necessary to have a licence, and there is no such thing as compounding for a large kennel. A puppy. it is hardly necessary to say, is exempt until it reaches the mature ago of six months, when in the eyes of the law it beoones a dog. I advise my readers not to try to dodge the revenue officials. It really is not worth while. THE POINTS OF THE AIREDALE. I have much pleasure in acceding to the re- quest of my oorrespondent A. H.—for the points of this magnificent terrier, of which I give, as a typical example, a sketch made from a photograph in The New Book of the Dog," publication by Messrs. Cassell, that should be in every dog-lover's possession. The following is the standard accepted by th.e Airedale Clubs: (1) Head.—Long, with flat, skuii, but not too broad between the ears, narrowing slightly to the ayes, free from wrinkle; stop hardlj visible, a TYPICAL AIREDALE TERRIER. I and cheeks free from fulness; jaw deep and powerful; lips light; ears V-shaped, with a side carriage; nose black; eyes small and dark. The neck should be of moderate length and thick- ness, gradually widening towards the shoulders and free from throatiness. (2) Shoulders long and sloping well into the back; chest deep, but not broad. (3) Back short, strong, and straight. (4) Hindquarters strong and muscular; hocks "ell set down; tail set on high, not curled. (5) Legs straight; feet small and round, with Rood depth of pad. (6) Coat hard and wiry, not ragged; straight and close. (7) Colour.—Head and ears. with the excep- tion of dark markings on each side of skull, tan, the ears being a darker shade than the rest. The £ 8 up to thigh and elbows also tan; the body olack or dark grizzle. (8) Weight.-Dogs about 401b. to 451b.; bitches slightly less. Some of these points are open to .critioism, but they will serve as a fair guide. SUPPLEMENTING THE ROBBE. In spite of a perfectly natural reluctance among farmers to displace the services of the horse in any way by mechanical power, there is no doubt that the agricultural motor is slowly coming to be looked upon as a necessity on the big farms. It seems to me that the small far- mer will find it even of greater value to him, al- ti though he would not have enough work to jus- tify the heavy outlay. If some scheme, however, can be devised by which a number of men can share a motor between them, as is now done in many cases as regards implements, and if it can AN AGBICTJLTUEAL MOTOR. found convenient to arrange so that two of "e joint owners do not want to use it at the ame time, it would prove itself a valuable in- vestment. It is needless to say that one compe- nt person would have to be appointed to take c arge ajj ^meSi j noecj not mention ,J1.ses to which it is possible to put such a machine as that shewn in my drawing. It will ? rf6 6nouSh j* I say that it ought, to assist, not to Qo away with, those animals which have served anan so long and so faithfully. STRAWBEHBIES BY FORCING. A correspondent who wrote me some time ago Will remember my promise to deal later with the forcing of Strawberries. Plants in pots which i. ^ell-ripened, plump crowns may now be +V.^ F ln<x> heat. It is obvious, however, that «< u- r.y started into growth the more .^v. their development and subse- oiitaincr ?.nd Amateur Gardening, in dis- earlv AU advises not to begin too for v. 64 pi-t carmot usually be set apart „.rawberry forc>ng, but a batch of plants 0t „ xcell^nt results if placed upon a top They muj-j. e^ntly Parted vinery or Peach house, each pot amP^e room, say, 2in. between Wash the not "fi I?e^r t^le glass as possible, ing qt^rters, and^lii £ °re,vanking them to forc" off a little of +v, ? dead leaves. Scrape Stick, and replace ?+ with a Pointc<l with bone meal, if ■, a loam mixed evidence dip the plants W ^is ™ insecticide previous to hous^n!^ £ -n°E sufficient if a" temperature ,w 50deg. is maintained. 6 of not more than SOFT-SHELLED EGGS The trouble complained of by "<<,j „ i, ,ii t j-is vVestfield 13 probably due to lack of the materials which are necessary to assist the hen in forming her eggs. All poultry should have a regular supply of cal- cined oyster shell, well smashed up after beine heated, or old mortar and other builder's Tefuse is useful. Even the dried shells of eggs used in the household can be powdered up firiel,J ånd

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; .~FARM NOTES.

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FARMING IN 1908.

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FAIRS AND MARKETS. I

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