Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

24 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

LONDON LETTER. -+-.--

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

LONDON LETTER. -+- Specially Wired. By Our Gallery Correspondent. lowo, Friday Night. The pertinacity with which Tory speakers bring unfouude 1 accusation against the leading men of the Liberal parcy, is again illustrated by the contents of the papers to-day. Mr Bright, for by no means the first time in his life, charges a Tory lec- turer with lying, and for the twentieth time a correction has had to be made of a. mis- statement respecting the mode of conducting the business of Messrs Chamberlain at Bir- mingham many years ago. SirWatkin Williams Wyn-n, M.P., who made this unfounded assertion, is a very young man, having suc- ceeded his uncle only a few months ago, and was at once elected a member of Parliament. He knows very little of the world and nothing of the amenities of public life. The lesson which has now been set him ought to do him good. It occurs to many here that to-day's conference at St. James's-hall and to-mor- row's demonstra.tion in Hyde-park are a trifle late. The Criminal Law Amendment Act has been passed, and if it is imagined that the question will be at once re-opened by the new Parliament on its reassembling, enthusiasm goes further than reason. Other questions will arise to demand the attention of the new House of Commons. The con- duct of the Pall Mall OVW: the Sir Charles Dilke incident, in the matter of its contents bill, indicated to what extent it finds sensa- tions pay. It had better try its hand on a new one. For this purpose the navy is played out, and so is the condition of our •oastipg stations. M. Henri Rochefort is no doubt mad, but a madman of this incendiary kind at large amongst so excitable a people as the French might do immense mischief. The licence ,of language under the Republic is cer- tainly a very wide one when it goes to the length of inciting the people i)f Paris to attack the British Embassy. Of course if the Embassy were assailed, Roehefort would hear of it, but it seems a pity that such a hopeless lunatic cannot be taken care of. The lies which Rochefort lellg in his paper sufficiently indicate what manner of man he is, but he ought not to be permitted to menace the British Embassy with the fate of the house of Jason. Lord Salisbury leaves Hatfield to-morrow for the Chalet Cecil, Dieppe, where he will remain a little time. He exchanges the close atmosphere of Arlington-street for the breezes of the Channel. He looks as ihongh he had been in office two years instead of two months, and to require a holiday. If the outside public at the formation of the Ministry wondered at the accuracy with which political movements were recorded, it may be stated that directly opposite the entrance gates of the house in Arlington-street is an hotel, in the bar parlour of which the reporters took up their position, and knowing the men who went in and out were enabled to send in the details of the movements with which newspaper readers were made so familiar. There is not much of political activity in London just now. Even Mr George Russell, with every anxiety to enlighten the. body politic by the frequent expression of his views, cannot, it is feared, much longer 8tandthis stagnant atmosphere and the depressifig itiftiatic" of the gloomy weather. At the same time, he is a very energetic politician, and nothing could better attest this fact than his presidency of to-day's conference at St. James's Hall. He is often confounded with Mr Clias. Russell, the eminent Queen's Counsel, both in parliamentary debates and at public meetings. With the conference and demon- stration over, members of Parliament, like Ministers, may be expected to take wing, and, leaving London for a time, seek that recreation required for the autumn work. It will be heavier than any known during the past half century. The American Press is justly proud of the extraordinary and costly exertion made by some of the New York papers to get their Sunday editions about. These Sunday editions, more particularly the New York Tribune's, are marvels in themselves. Some of the English provincial weekly papers need not shrink from comparison with the Tribune in the matter of diversified and interesting reading. Certainly we have nothing like it in London. It is only of late years that this system of issuing seven daily ?ipers in the week has obtained in New ork, and has apparently proved so lucrative that no efforts are spared to make the Sunday edition attractive. The latest development is the special trains going at top apeed to carry the papers to populous watering-places. Saratoga Springs and Newport are the two places where New Yorkers congregate on summer Sundays, and the Herald and the Tribune literally run a race to be there first with their papers. The Tribune, has, every Sunday, a special train to Greenport, a distance of 95 miles, and thence a special steamer carries the precious bundles of papers to expectant Newport, which thinks itself ill-used if it has not its New York paper on its table at breakfast time. The train consists of an engine and a single car, which leaves the neighbourhood of New York at three in the morning, and does the 95 miles in an hour and forty-three minutes. Saratoga Springs is a much further distance, the railway trip at top speed being four hours and a half. But the papeis re*ach Saratoga at eight in the morning. ° The great speed attained on these jour- neys is much more noticable in the United States than it is in England. The feat of 95 miles in an hour and 43 minutes, which is thought worthy of a paean a column long in the New York press, is quietly done every day in the year by the Great Northern Railway, and is approached by half a score of the other English Railways. Every day a Great Northern train leaves Grantham at 4.17, reaching King's Cross two minutes under the two hours, having run 105^ miles, maintaining a level speed of 53 miles an hour. The Tribune's Sunday express con- sists of only the engine and single carriage, y 11 with no other freight than the newspaper bundles. But the Great Northern, of course, performs the ordinary duty of a passenger train. Where the sensational feat of the American newspaper trains beat the ordinary English railway service 18 in the matter of the long run. On the journey to Saratoga the newspaper trains ran from New York to Albany without stopping, and Albany is just 147 milea from New York. The Great Northern ran, already mentioned, of 105i miles, is the biggest, as it is the fastest thing done in the English railway service. The next most rapid run is the Great Western flight from Paddington to Swindon, the pace maintained being 53! miles. The next longest run is from St. Pancras to Leicester, on the Midland Rail- way, a distance of 9% miles.

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