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'ARMY BRUTALITY. ! - j

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'ARMY BRUTALITY. War Secretary Refuses Enquiry. Gen. Codrington's Views! In the House of Commons yesterday, Mr. Briant asked the Secretary of State for War whether his attention had been called to the charges of brutality and bribery in connexion with the treatment of recruits in the Guards, and whether, '.m view of the prejudicial effect of such statements on recruiting and the reputa- tion of the Army, he would order an in- quiry to be made as to the truth of the luk-gations. A Mr. Churchill in reply said that he did not think that he would be justified in ordering an inquiry of this special char- acter because a book had been published by a certain individual which contained a number of allegations. INJURY TO REGIMENT. j Sir T. Courtenay Warner (Co. Lib., Lichfield): Are there no means by which false statements can be publicly cor- rected and inj ury to regiment and the Army which this book will bring about can be stopped ? Sir John Rees (Co. U., Nottingham E.): Is not a system which produces the best infantry in the world best left alone? BEST-TRAINED SOLDIER. I Lieut.-General A. E. Codringtoii, colonel I' of the Coldstream Guards, in a letter to the Times" on the question to-day, says that "Comparisons are odious," and, without wishing to detract from the merits and achievements of certain favourites of the Press, 1 venture to I assert that the official record of the work of the Guards Division, whether in the offensive or the defensive, will compare j favourably with that of any other divi- sion. The depot at Cnterham does not exist for inculcating any kind of old Army discipline, whatever that expression may mean, but to produce the best-trained soldier, both morally and physically, tnat is possible in the time allotted; and Cleachievements of the Brigade of Guards in the past as well as in the late trar are surely the best answer to thio vague accusation. As to recruits never being allowed to think, and no initiative being permitted, for years past it has been the practice to train the men in individual work as well as iii drill, so as to develop their intelli- gence as much as possible. LOCAL M'S LETTER. I A London contemporary to-day contains I the following letter:— I myself, hav;ng served in the Cold- stream Guards, have witnessed the hrutality of N.C.O's towards their men. What was the cause of so many fine fel- lows ending their lives? Nothing, only the d:sgraceful way they were treated by N.C.O's It was terrible in 1818, when the 'flu was so bad, to see the poor fel- lows cha-sed about until they fell, and then often left until an officer would come along and have them removed out of the way. I have seen a poor fellow chased about I with a pack on his back all day long by I a rotter of an N.C.O. It is a Tide bell ¡ on earth Were it not fcr the loyalty to our King and country, trouble would have arisen long ago.—Ex-Guardsman Price, 25160, Gorseinon, South Wales.

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