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Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

The Day's Gossip.

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The Day's Gossip. Leader Office, Friday. The sketch of the Swansea cenotaph shows a very impressive monument on the Promenade, and if our photographer can. overcome the difficultig6 of colour, which make it hard to reproduce, readers will be able to come to their own judgment. Per- sonally I feel that the austerity of the cenotaph is taken from by the accessories introduced around it. The Whitehall monument holds attention because of its loneliness and the absolute absence of anything that may be called ornamental. I Swansea in Cardiff. I A large part of the population of Swan- sea travelled up to Cardiff to-day! The 8.35 this morning had a very Assize-y look about it. How all these witnesses will fare in over-crowded Cardiff I do not know; probably they will have to journey I to and fro every day until the causes are decided. f The Sergeant's Mess. I Mr. St. Gerrans, defending in the Woking lieutenant case, is reported to haveeacd: I do not know what the regula- tions are, but 1 think it is a disgraceful thing for officers to frequent sergeants* messes If he had only inquired a little, he would have discovered that the reason is only that there was usually a billiard table in the sergeants' mess and none in the officers' mess. When it was not in use, the officers in many battalions had the I habit of a hundred up after dinner at night. Escaping from Germany. I I A military regulation states that every I prisoner, of war- should make some effort 1 to escape, probably for the sake of moral ) and to make an increase of the guard I necessary, and altogether to give as much trouble as possible to the captors. This counsel of perfection Mr. Edward Page, of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, evi- dently took to heart, for he performed his duty nobly, and made no fewer than three attempts to escape. He had been wounded outside Antwerp, and was cap- tured in a hospital there. In Escaping from Germany he has written an ac- count of his experiences. He was unlucky i.1 his first attempt to esoape from the Dortmund Lager, being recaptured only three miles from the frontier. A Ra.pid Writer. I The Editor of the "Yorkshire Post," whose death was announced the othoi day, had a rare turn for speed in writing iiis leading articles. At the same time, rhey were clear, lucid, and unmistakeable, in meaning. Phillips was earlier associ- ated with the late Mr. Cooper, of the Scotsman," whose boast it was that no other man in the British Isles oould turn out a leading article—that is to say. a readable, intelligent leading article—in so short a time as he. with probably one exception, his assistant, Phillips. There. were occasions when the two, in order to defeat Time, collaborated in one '"leader," and with such skill that it was impos- sible to detect any change in style throughout. The-E-10,000 a Year Man. I It is only human to feel a certain thrill in Sir Albert Stanley's calm announce- ment that there are plenty of vacancies for men on salaries up to £ 10,0(10 a year in the new world. A fellow gossip boasts that he knows of one man who actually draws E2,5,000 a year, though he has never discovered what precisely he does for it. That, I suppose, is the essence of the thing. These very big men of the com- mercial world seem to have very little to do, even it they do not quite reach the ideal of the American who said that in the perfectly organised office the man who drew the biggest salary had nothing to do but sit with his feet up on the table smoking cigars. And how do big firms estimate the worth of a man-as, for in- stance, between £ 7,000 a year and £ 10,000? Presmably there is some law of supply and demand which keeps the market up. If So-and-So is worth £ 8,000 to that man he is worth £9,000 to me." It must be a curious little world, this of the super- servants I dur Movie ThriU. Roamer" wants to know how this would film as Owl Episode No. 2." Get away you boys, and give him fair play to unreel: At Land's End! At Land's End% Where they would find the ocean and the Comishmen's baited hooks-tbat would be their firc-t halting place. That's what old man Hawfinch proposed, and the ayes had it, on the branch in the little glade in Gowerland! The nays were npwherel And in the November cold they huddled together for warmth. That very night a long-earetl owl, peered with saucer eyes of flame for bird fare, which was almost non est. He saw old man Hawfinch, and clutched him with that terrible hand- shake, of the owl-bite, which means death. Old man Hawfinch ripped out the most appalling dungeon shriek you ever went goosy all over about around the fire- side. The smallest hawfinch grumbled sleepily to keep still, and went off to sleep again. The next morning, old man was missed, but putting his absence down to some amorous adventure, the party I left him to follow them, and started off, whiistling-" To Land's End! To Land's End!! I A Memory of Pop." Memories of the autumn of 1916 and the following winter in the Ypres Salient will, be roused in the minds of Old 38th men by the publication of Tales of Talbot House" by P. B. Clayton, M.C. Many will remember the house in Pop which waa started to give light, noise, warmth, Overcrowding, wallpaper, however faded, jiowers in vases, open fireplaces and a tabby cat blinking at the flames." Poper- inghe was in a typically 1915 eönditlon in the winter when Talbot House was opened as "Everyman's Club," under the direction of Mr. Clay- ton, Garrison Chaplain. Out of the shell-battered house of a rich brewer Mr. Clayton and his enthusiastic accom- plices. created a refuge which the sensible "Q." of the 6th Division flatly forbade, ^hem to label as "Church House." It i was to be "Talbot House or nothing. The Assistant Chaplain-General to the 5th Army, Neville Talbot, protested, but was, firmly overruled. The cha,pel ornaments were for the most part gifts from the men who had knelt there, the only recorded re-1 fiisal being of a carpet brought to Mr. Clayton by a real old soldier," familiarly known as the General," who had quietly lifted it from the temporarily'unoccupied house nixt door:— "It is incumbent upon the clergy to take their stand at such moments upon bed-rock principle. General, I can't say my prayers kneeling upon a stolen carpet.' Silence hereafter for a space; then a bright idea. Well, Sir, if yer won't 'are it in the church itll do lovely for yer sitting-room.' jWhen even this brilliant talternative is dismissed as Jppuitioil. qnd the carpet restored to the place it came from, a few days elapse tranquilly. Then the General' scores heavily one morn- ing: 'Yes remember that carpet. Sir?' J. admit it. 'Well. the A-&C. 'a.n marounsed it now.'

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POULTRY CORNS AND I I-MEALS.

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