Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

34 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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I The Man About Town.

IA BOY'S FOLLY.

I HIGHLY CONNECTED.

LAWN TENNIS. I--AENNI8.

I TO-DAY'S WEATHER,4.30P.M…

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Polar Balloon.

Babies' Bodies.I

ITHE ORNAMENTAL RASHER.

A MAN PAINTED. j

I SUFFOCATED IN DOUGH.

IRATING OF DOWLAIS WORKS.

l A Cast of the Net."

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LOCAL LAW CASE.

i NEGRO LYNCHING.

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The Murder of a Singer.

!Explosive Hair-wash. I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

Explosive Hair-wash. I HUMAN ELECTRICITY. I Views of an Expert. I A singular and interesting development has arisen out of the sad case in which Mrs Samuel- son lately lost her life. Few schoolboys attend- ing classes on electricity have failed to follow the advice of their teacher to experiment with the domestic cat in a dark room. As everybody knows, when the hair of the animal is violently rubbed the wrong way, and the cat permits the operation to proceed for a sufficient length of time, electric sparks are emitted in the most lively fashion. Similarly, human beings are a.dmittédly. possessed ,of electricity, and the point arises whether, given the presence on the human head of a spirit throwing off highly inflammable ftpour, violent friction of the hair, such as may occur in the course of shampooing, may not develop that electricity to such an extent as to cause ignition. 1 Interview with a Chemist. An inquiry of this descrip tion is by no means to be put aside, for yesterday it was brought to the notice of a very distinguished analytical chemist, who affirmed that the matter deserved the closest investigation. I would not say that it is at all impossible for the West End accident to have been caused in the way you suggest. If a cat gives off electric sparks, I don't see why human hair, when violently rubbed, should not produce the same result. You must under- stand that no ordinary spark would cause the ignition of vapour. A spark from a flint or from a fire of coal or wood would not do it. But the smallest electric spark would set aflame this highly volatile benzoline, which, I have no doubt, is the substance that was used." Then it is possible, as the coiffeurs suggest, that there was no gas-jet in the saloon in which this lady was being shampooed, and that, never- theless, the accident happened ? Quite possible, because, as I say, the smallest spark of electricity given off from the lady's hair might have caused the mischief. I confess I should like to make some experiments in regard to this matter of human electricity. I know a lady who was one evening making her toilet when, looking inside her bodice, she noticed a spark, and proceeded to douche herself with water, imagin- ing that she was on fire. The spark was I Undoubtedly the Result of Electricity. The amount of electricity in individuals vanes considerably, and certain conditions of the atmosphere tend to assist its development. In Canada, for instance, where they heat their rooms with stoves, and the air gets very dry, the slightest friction will produce electricity. Two people walking across the carpet will generate so much friction that when they shake hands there will be a mild electric shock. Indoors in winter it is hardly safe to kiss in Canada, lest an electric spark should be produced." In this case the atmosphere was presumably hot and dry, for the midday sun was pouring down upon the skylight of the saloon." Yes, but at best this theory of an electric spark is what I call a puzzled explanation. I can well imagine that if this lady's hair bad been exposed to the sun, and was quite dry, the appli- cation of friction by the hairdresser might produce a spark. But if, as you say, the coiffeur was at the time of the accident twisting the hair in coils in order to rinse it of the benzoline wash, it is difficult to say whether there could in those circumstances be sufficient friction to cause a spark. I can only tell you of a case which I Happened a Few Years Ago, when some people were extracting grease from sheepskins with a petroleum product, and an explosion occurred. It was then supposed that an electric spark, produced by the application of friction to the skins, was the cause of the mischief. I only say that in the present case the matter is sufficiently doubtful to justify experiment." You contend, then, that in addition to the liability of this hair-wash to ignite as a result of contact with flame, there is a possible risk of its ignition by a spark of human electricity, which makes ita use still more dangerous ? I do, and that the sooner the stuff goes out of use the better. Thete are plenty of less dan- gerous compounds. With ammonia, for example, whioh is used for what is called a dry shampoo, there is no danger." "WhILt would be the effect of this benzoline when applied to the hair ?" It would take up all the grease, and cleanse the hair perfectly. It is said it promotes the growth, but as to that I won't offer an opinion. I can quite understand that by removing al greasy matter the benzoline would make the hair I so brittle that it might break. Apart from that I don't think it would be injurious, but, as I ¡ have said already, wise people will avoid its use."

I DISASTROUS FIRE.

j CrimeinFrance. ICrime in…

THE FEAR OF MADNESS. I

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, CARDIFF…

SHOCKING DEATH OF A TRAMP.

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THE ETERNAL CLAUSE 23. !

PAST EVENTS IN OUR ISLAND…

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