Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

27 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE. The following particulars were furnished to the reporter of the Cape Times by Mr. Longcast. the able Zulu inter- preter, who accompanied Lord Chelmsford's force to Ulundl, and who is now In official attendance upon Cetywayo in the Castle, Cape Town:— At about eleven o'clock on the morning of the 31st of August Cetywayo was marched into Ulundi under the escort of Major Marter'a party. There was no one to receive him with the dignity which even a captured savage monarch could command, for he had rejected the overtures of Sir Garnet Wolseley, M he had those of Lord Chelmsford. It was not M a defeated monarch, but as a fugitive from law and order he was brought into the English camp, and he was treated accordingly. Cetywayo, who ap. preciates nicely the courtesies due to rank-so those who know him tell me-felt this keenly. Sir Garnet Wolseley did not see him at all, and Mr. John Shep- etone only had an interview with him to tell him that he would leave under the charge of Major Poole for -no one knew where. The instructions to the Major were, on leaving Uiundi, to proceed to Pietermaritz- burg, vid Rorke's Drift; but the camp had not been left many miles behind before a messenger to the Major from the General gave Port Dumford as the Eort of eoabarcation. Cetywayo spent less than three ours amid the ruins of Ulundi,^ and when he left them he was not aware of his destination. His hope was that he was going to Pietermaritzburg. He used to say :—' I am no longer a King; let me go and live at Pietermaritz burg like any other poor Zulu.' This he believed was where he was going until he came to Kwagmagwaza, and he said :— 'This is not the way to the l'ugela,' He grew moody after this, and used to moan that it was better to be killed than sent over the sea. That Major Poole nsed all diligence in getting to the sea is certain. Cety- wayo, with his women, travelled in an ambulance drawn by 10 mules; the remainder of his party were in common buck-waggon drawn by 10 mules, and yet on the first day no lesa a distance than 40 miles was accomplished, the halt being made at Fort Victoria; next day Kwagmaewaza (22 miles) was reached; next day, St. Paul's (23 mile.); next day, Fort Inverary and, finally, Port Durnford was arrived at on the 4th -of September, and the whole party was immediately mbatked.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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