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DENBIGH TOWN COUNCIL TAKE…

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DENBIGH TOWN COUNCIL TAKE UP THE DRAIN AGE QUESTION. AN ENGINEER TO BE CALLED IN. MR. HOWEL GEE AND "THE LITTLE COTERIE AT THE ENGLISH CHAPEL » THE RATEPAYERS' PETITION «HELD OVER." U ecial meeting of the Denbigh Town Cou as keld on Tuesday afternoon for the p /-»e of dealing with the question of the town sewage and the defective con- dition of the main drai. and outfall. There were present the Mayor, Coun- cillor A 0 Evans, in the chair Aldermen Robert Owen and John Davies, Councillors T A Wynne Edwards, James Hughes, R Humphreys Roberts, E J Swayne, W Mellard, David Lloyd, M.B., Boaz Jones, J Howel Gee, Roger Pryce, Griffith Jon-s, the Town Clerk (Mr Parry Jones), the Deputy Town Clerk (Mr Edwfr(L^rry)' the Medical Officer (Dr Griffith Williams Roberts), the Surveyor (Mr John Davies), the Inspector (Mr Windsor). Aldermen W D W Griffith and A Lloyd Jones, and Councillor J Humphrey Jones apologised for unavoidable absence. THE COUNCIL S TELEGRAM TO THE KING. The Town Clerk read a copy of the King's reply to the telegram of congratu- lation from the Council on the termination of the war. (Bath of these appear in another column.) J A LIVELY DEBATE ON SANITATION. THE MAIN DRAIN A HUGE ELONGATED CESSPOOL." Dr Lloyd had given notice to rescind a resolution passed on the 15th day of April, 1902, "that the matter of the reconstruction of the main drainage of the borough be deferred for two months." In making the proposition he said he did so not on account ef anything which had lately appeared in the Press, or the agitation in the town, but because the time had arrived that the Council should take action. Some people had became aware that the main sewer is faulty, but that was no news, as it had been reported upon by their own officers, and it was well-known to the Local Government Board. The matter would have been pressed forward by the Council before, but there were, difficuties in the way, one of the chief of which was that the Asylum authorities had delayed sending a reply to say whether they wished to make arrangements to connect their drainage with the town sewer or not, and this delay of the Asylum authorities had been the cause of expense to the Council, for they had had to construct ventilat;on shafts on the main sewer, which had relieved the pressure on the pipes, but of course was only a tem- porary measure but the time had now come to deal with the wlole question. He concluded by moving the resolution. Mr James Hughes said he had much pleasure in seconding the resolution, for he claimed that no one in the Council had a greater anxiety to put the town into a thoroughly satisfactory manner than he had, and be had done all he eould to get them to adopt a soheme for the improve- ment of the outfall sewer. They had been very busy for a long time calling upon owners of property to put the drains on their premises ic a proper sanitary con- dition, and yet at the same time they had allowed the Council sewers to remain in a condition which would not for a day be tolerated upon the premises of private individuals. There was no con- sistency in anything of that sort (hear, hear). He was very proud to feel that he had been the means of having those ventilating shafts placed on the Ruthin- road sewer, as he felt certain if they had not been erected they would have had a most serious epidemic in the town before now. No doubt those shafts relieved the pressure of sewer gas in the sewer, but still they were not sufficient for the pur- pose, and anyone passing along the road could not fail to detect the sewer gas which escaped through the untrapped street gullies. At present, instead of the sewage finding its way along the sewer to Whit- church, it was simply the liquid that passed through the four inches of the drain now available for the passage of the sewage, and all the solid matter was deposited in the sewer itself, which as Mr Bulnois had said had become a huge elongated cesspool, the stench from which was unbearable. He considered that every member of the Council ought to realise the responsibility which rested upon them to put the town in a thoroughly sanitary condition and that no time should be lost in carrying out whatever is necessary to be done to secure a perfectly efficient system of sanitation. Mr Howel Gee said he agreed that the time had come to take this step, but the people of the town did not know what the Council had been doing. They had been busy at work, and it must not be thought that the Council now took the question up hpp&nse of the action of a small eoteri* at ?he English Chapel (oh). No, the Council had been busy, there had been no delay at all on their part, they had done a great deal, and the outoome of it had been the telegram which the Town Clerk had re- ceived in reply to a letter which he had written to the Local Government Board, by order of the Council (cries of "No, no not by order of the Council,") and he wished that letter and telegram read (no, no). Mr James Hughes and other members contended that what the Town Clerk had written by order of the Council was a reply to a letter received from Mr Barker-a totally different thing to what Mr Gee said (hear, hear). Mr Gee contended he was right. Several members appealed to the Town Clerk, who having referred to the minutes, shewed that Mr Gee's contention was wrong. Mr Gee contended that the telegram and letter written by the Town Clerk should be read. This was met by strong opposition from several members who pointed out that the letter sent by the Town Clerk was of his own initiative and was not written by order of the Council, and should not therefore be read. Mr Wynne Edwards, interposing, asked the Mayor if he had received a petition from ratepayers on this drainage question. The Mayor: Never mind the petition now, Mr Wynne Edwards, the question before us is whether this letter of the Town Clerk shall be read. W- r'ee contended it should be read and otlie -e' ubers insisted that it should not. 1\ Humphreys Roberts moved that neither the telegram nor letter be read. Mr Swayne seconded it. This was carried by a large majority. Mr Gee then proceeded to speak on the question generally, and urged that he had been the means of that April resolution being passed, and he was not sorry for the i delay, as it had brought the Asylum I authorities into communication with them. Mr Boaz Jones said he was convinced that the Council was not to be blamed for the delay, which had caused all that talk and agitation in the town; it was the Asylum people who weie to blame for not having told them what they wanted. Eventually the resolution of Dr Lloyd was put to the meeting and carried nem CUlt. CALLING IN AN ENGINEER TO ADVISE. AN ATTEMPT TO PUT THE CART BEFORE THE HORSE" OUTVOTED. The next business was "I to receive a report of the committee of the whole Council as to the reconstruction of the main drainage of the borough," and this report which had been adopted in the Council in Committee, on the proposition of Mr James Hughes, seconded by Mr R Humphreys Roberts, was as follows:— "That the Town Council be recommended to call in an engiueer to report upon the present outfall sewer of the town, and to advise upon the best means of dealing with it in future." Dr Lloyd, as chairman of the Sanitary Committee, moved the adoption of this report, which was seconded by Mr Swayne. Mr Gee opposed the calling in of an engineer, which he thought was premature. He was the father of a family, and nobody was more anxious than himself that the town should be healthy, but he did not want the Council to follow every hare that was started. He wished the public to know that the object of the Council in delaying was to find out whether the Asylum wanted them to provide for taking in their sewage, which might be 50,000 gallons of sewage a day (oh). They were rather sub- ject to fads in that Council (ironical hear, hears). Two or three months ago they were absolutely committed to the septic tank system. (Loud cries of 44 No, no," "Nonsense," "Nothing of the kind," and much opposition.) Mr Gee (striking the table) I say absolutely (no, no). Mr Hughes We were not committed at all; all that was recommended was that an Engineer be called in to report as to the advisability of the septic tank system being adopted. Mr Gee: Oh, no, nothing of the kind (yes, yes). Mr Hughes appealed to the Town Clerk if that was not correct. The Town Clerk read the former resolution which bore out that view of the case, and commenced" with a view to adopting, &c." Mr Gee: Not one of us knew anything about the septic treatment (oh, oh and laughter). Mr James Hughes: fcpeak for yourself. Some of us know all about it, and others have been studying it (hear, hear). Mr Gee: You don't know the ins and oats of it (laughter and "yes, we do.") I should like to know if any of you have seen it in operation. Now they were going to commit the Council to something they knew nothing about, and they did noc know whether there was any available land down the brook for it. It had been suggested that. the outfall should be in what he might call the alley down at Captain's Bridge, anywhere be- tween there and Lleweni, they did not know where (oh, oh). He was in favour, before they appointed an engineer, of having a committee to go into the question (no, no) and to find out whether there was any land down Captain's Bridge they could have, and where it was and what would be the price of the land (oh and no, no"). He wanted to know also what the cost of the system would be. A Member: How could they know the cost until they had decided what was to be done ? Mr Gee: Well, ;let us know within a thousand or two what the cost of the land and the tanks will be (laughter). Mr Wynne Edwards: Why not say within a million? (loud laughter.) Mr Gee continued to argue in favour of getting these prices and information before appointing an engineer. At length the voting was taken. For the report and appointment of an engineer there voted: The Mayor, Dr Lloyd, Messrs R Humphreys Roberts, James Hughes, T A Wynne Edwards, Robert Owen, Boaz Jones, E J Swayne, and W Mellard-9. Against: Messrs Howel Gee, Roger Pryce, and John Davies.—Mr Griffith Jones, being the tenant of the present outfall land, did not vote nor take part in the discussion. THE SELECTION OF AN ENGINEER. MR. GEE AGAIN OBJECTS: PREFBR8 A COMMITTEE. The Council having thus decided to ap- point an Engineer, Mr R Humphreys Roberts proposed that the Local Government Board be asked to send to the Council the names of three Engineers whom they would recommend to the Council to report upon the best means of dealing with the drainage, from which three names the Council could select one. Mr Wynne Edwards seconded the motion. Mr Howel Gee opposed this and moved that a committee be appointed to ascertain what land could be secured and the cost of it, and also to ascertain whether the Asylum authorities intended to join their sewage system to the town drain or not. Mr Boaz Jones was in favour of a com- mittee to find out about the land and such other matters before the Engineer came down. The movers of the amendment for the committee proceeded to propose names for the committee. On naming Mr Humphreys Roberts as one, he most peremptorily refused to have anything to do with it. He would not act on any sueh committee. Mr James Hughes's name was mentioned, when he said he certainly should not act; it would be a piece of impertinence on their part to appoint such a committee (hear, hear). The Engineer appointed would be a man of some eminence, who would know a great deal better than they did what woum be the most suitable site for the out- fall. Such a man should have quite a free hand (bear. hear). hand (bear. hear). Mr Gee again urged that the committee should get first of all information as to the working of septic tanks, and about the I best site, and where the land could be had and price, if an engineer came down and had to do all these preliminary things he would be getting perhaps £50 a day for a montk 1 (cries of "No, no," and "Non- ") sense, ) and meandering all over the Vale in search of sites. Mr James Hughes: Absurd. Everyone knows that there is only one direction in a town like ours for the outfall. Eventually the motion of Mr Humphreys Roberts was carried It was further agreed to that the Sanitary Committee should prepare the necessary papers and information required by the Engineer when he came down. THE RATEPAYER^' PETITION. KEEPING IT IN THE BACKGROUND. Mr Wynne Edwards asked the Mayor what had become of the petition presented by the ratepayers on the drainage question. The Mayor said he knew nothing about any petition, but he understood that one had been received in his absence from home. Mr Wynne Edwards: Then you have not received the petition ? The Mayor said N., but he under- stood one had been received since he left home, but it did not come into the Town Clerk's hands until after the netioes for this special meeting had gone out, and could not therefore be put upon the agenda. It would, he presumed, be taken into con- sideration at the next meeting of the Council. (This petition, which contained the names of 231 ratepayers, is referred to elsewhere in our columns). MR ROGER PRYCE AND THE SANITARY INSPECTORSHIP. Mr Roger Pryce asked to have the standing orders suspended whilst he dis- cussed the question of the qualifications of the Sanitary Inspector to be appointed. He wanted to propose that instead of it being necessary that the person appointed should hold a certificate of the Sanitary Institute, a person might be selected who would undertake to pass such an examina- tion say in 6 or 12 months after appoint- ment. Dr Griffith Roberts: We must have a practical man of some experience. The Mayor said he must rule Mr Roger Pryce out of order; the subject could not be discussed without notice. Mr Roger Pryce, throwing his papers down on the table with much demonstration, said: I shall give notice of the question for the next meeting. » THE WATER SUrrLY OF THE TOWN. GRAVE COMPLAINT BY THE MEDICAL OFFICER. I Dr Griffith Williams Roberts, the melical officer, said he desired to invite the Council to go with him and see the condition of the source from which the water they were drinking is drawn, and the state of the water course from which it is passed to the reservoir. It was in a most filthy con- dition, and he asked the permission of the Council to take a sample of the water to be analysed. Mr Wynne Edwards suggested that the Doctor should take the sample of the water at once and not delay it. This was agreed to. Dr Lloyd said that the watershed was one very liable to pollution, and he agreed with the Medical Officer that it was advisable that the Council should go and see it for themselves. It was agreed that as many of the Council as could should go with the Medical Officer on Thursday afternoon.

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