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ENTHUSIASTIC WELCOME I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

ENTHUSIASTIC WELCOME I FROM THE FRENCH PEOPLE. I SIR JOHN FRENCH IN PARIS. I The veil which since the beginning of the war has hidden the movements of the British Army has been lifted. The Official Press Bureau on Monday night issued the following statement: The Expeditionary Force as detailed for foreign service has been safely landed on French soil. The embarkation, transportation, and disembarkation of men and stores were alike carried through with the greatest precision and without a single casualty. After making the above announcement Mr. F. E. Smith added: "Lord Kitchener wishes me Do add that he and the country ara under the greatest obligation to the Press for the loyalty with which all references to movements of the Expeditionary Force in this country and on their landing have been suppressed. Lord Kitchener is well aware that much anxiety must ha, been caused to the English Press by the knowledge that these matters wece being freely described and discussed in the Continental Press; and he wishes to assure the Press of this country that noth- ing but the conviction of the military im- portance to this country of suppressing these movements would have led him to issue instructions which placed the Press of this country under a temporary disadvant- e" age. SCENES OF JUBILATION. The movement of the troops has been proceeding for a week past. Transports, closely guarded by warships, have conveyed c l o-e i v -iiar t e d by wa-. the soldiers from various home ports to Boulogne, Calais, Dunkirk, and Ostend, where they have received an enthusiastic welcome from the people of France and Bel- gium. The embarkation of the troops has been carried on under the strictest secrecy. For the present the numbers and destina- tion of the British force are not stated, but the successful accomplishment of the ta.sk of transport without a single casualty is a tribute to the organising ability of the War Office. Nobody but officials At the ports of dis- embarkation knew when the transports would arrive. A correspondent of the Echo de France," who witnessed the unexpected arrival of transports at a Belgian port, writes that the spectacle was one of delirious joy. L "Almost the entire Belgian public," he says, "collected to see the big fellows, dressed in red from head to foot, an excel- lent target for bullets. Instead, we saw strong, fresh, and agile youths free from all haughtiness, of a martial and resolute gait. Vivent les Anglais! Vive le roi George Vive Kitchener!' These cries were repeated a thousand times, and did not cease until, from one end of the line to another, an English melody began to resound—not, indeed, sung, but whistled in a most charm- ing manner, perfectly new to us. The piping began softly, and then it grew louder and louder, in extraordinary crescendo. "VIVE L'ANGLETERRE!" Everybody here is confident of the ulti- mate result, especially after one has seen these brave English soldiers. I have never regretted so much my ignorance of the Eng- lish language. I wanted so much to shout in English what I shouted with everybody else in 11 .French: 'Vivc l'Anglterre! Víve Ie roi Gecr,-e!' One of them at least did un- derstand us. because he replied to us in good French: 'Vive la Belgique! Vive la France'' I wished I could have embraced him!" ARE WE DOWNHEARTED The landing at Boulogne is described by •y^e "Mail" correspondent, who writes: "For two days the finest troops England has ever sent across the sea have been marching through the narrow streets of old Boulogne in solid columns of khaki, thous- ands upon thousands of them, roaring as they pass that new slogan of Englishmen: "Are we downhearted? No-o-o-o-oo! "Shall we win? Ye-e-e-e-e-s-s-s." "To-day they are marching to the camps on the hills above Boulogne. Watch them as they pass, every man in the prime of life, not a youth or stripling among them. Their shirts are open at the front, and as they shout you can see the working of the muscles of their throats, their wide-open mouths and rows of dazzling teeth. Every movement spells fitness for the field, for long marches by day and longer nights in the trenches, for hard fighting and rough living. "Ah gasped a Frenchwoman stand- ing on the steps of an hotel as they passed. "It makes me ill of the heart to see so many fine men marching to the war. They are so full of life. Never have I seen such splen- did men. Oh, but they are brave to go laughing." I can see them again, with their brown, jolly faces, full of laughter. and hear them still shouting and singing, "It's a long wav to Tipperary it's a long Way to go while the officers, with the quiet, confident smiles, ride between, raising hands in salute to their French comrades in arms on the pavements. This mornings "France du -No,I says -with justice. "The gallant bearing of the men, their gaiety, fine looks, muscular ap- pearance, as well as their spl-e,idid conduct, are of happy augury." Certainly if phy- sical strength and a. happy disposition, added to fine training, can win the day, the British Expeditionary, troops will add many a fine battle name to their roll of vic- tories. WHISTLING THE "MARSEILLAISE." I I have seen one company whistling the "Marseillaise," another marching to the pipes. A wonderful invasion. How many more thousands are to come no one Vnows. Transport after transport glides into the inner harbour or ranges along the quay where the Folkestone boats lie, and out they come, each man neat and clean, as for parade, hard and fit. For everything, men, horses, and stores, a place has been appointed, and everything goes to its place with automatic celerity. The camps and the stores fill the French officers with admiration. Your men," said one to me, "ought to fight well on all that meat and jam and sleep well in these tents." THE COMMANDER. At six o'clock on Monday Field-Marshal Sir John French came, the man under whom these tens of thousands of British troops will fight. He came like the great com- mander, standing on the quarter-deck of the scout Sentinel, with his war staff round him. Boulogne rushed to the quays and raised a cheer as the black and warlike Sentinel with her decks cleared for action and crowded with sailors slipped into the harbour. On the qilay stood "Daru, Gover- nor of Boulogne," by permission of whom in these martial days all things happen in this town, white-haired and white-mous- tached, the embodiment of French official courtesy and military precision. A crane swung a long gangway from quay to war vessel and 0 Daru descended. For two minutes Sir John and the Gover- nor stood talking, each with his hand raised to the salute. It was one of the his- toric moments of this marvellous war, this official meeting of the milit.ary governor of this ancient fortified city, which has many a time listened to the clash of arms between England and France, with the commander of a British force, now for the first time landing with all arms in full panoply of war as a friend and an ally.

—'—.—*** VIVE LE GENERAL FRENCH.i

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:OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER.

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