Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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Newyddion
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Rhannu

ftmftfit Cwtrespibntt. [We deem it right to state that we do not identic ourselves with our correspondent's opinions.] I never recollect a time when any event in Parlia- ment was looked forward to with more anxiety than the Budget last Friday night. During the day, it was the topic of conversation wherever you went. In the City but little business was done, feverish expectation taking the place of the ordinary energy with which City men transact business. The purlieus of Palace- yard and Westminster Hall were filled with knots of anxious loungers. Whatever they could expect to see or hear, I can't imagine. I suppose they came from that indefinable curiosity which leads a crowd to gather round a house where a murder has been com. mitted, and stare up at the walls and the windows. Round the lobby leading to the entrance to the strangers' gallery there were about five times as many as the gallery itself would hold. Everybody seems to have asked his member for an order, and the efforts to obtain a seat in the gallery were very ardent, and generally very unsuccessful. At a little after four this gallery was full, and as those once in seemed pretty generally determined to sit it out, I suppose the out- siders, after hanging about Westminster Hall till they were tired of it, had to smile grimly and wend their way homewards. The preliminary part of the business of the House was listened to as impatiently as a first piece is listened to on the first night of a pantomime. A buzz of de- light was perceptible as Mr. Gladstone walked up to the Treasury bench on the right of Mr. Speaker. He certainly looked poorly and rather jaded, but little more so than usual, for his countenance usually seems "sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought." He commenced speaking, just in front of the red dispatch- box on which Mr. Disraeli would like to be leaning his hand now-a-nights, a few minutes before five, and he spoke for four hours. His style was clear, and his voice showed very little symptoms of the cold from which he had just recovered. At distant intervals he refreshed himself with draughts of something or other, which might have been medicine, or sherry-and-water, or lemonade, or anything else; but it was not the or- thodox water with which right hon. and hon. members usually refresh themselves. Apart from its import- ance, the speech was not an interesting one, and signs of weariness in the audience were undoubted before the right hon. gentleman had spoken an hour; but the importance of the subject tended to keep up the in- terest, and a large proportion of the strangers in the gallery sat it out till nine o'clock, when, amid cheers from the Ministerial benches, and comparative silence from the Opposition, Mr. Gladstone concluded a speech which, for importance, has not been equalled for many years. As to the matter of the speech, I will say nothing. One result of the largeness of the scheme which Mr. Gladstone brought forward has been, that more than usual time has been demanded for its consideration; and one result of this again has been, that the Reform Bill has been put off. Curiously enough, an outcry has been raised about this from some of the very party who require the time which leads to its postponement. There is no doubt, however, that it will be brought forward by Lord John Russell, if the Budget in its main features be carried. I say "if," because there are -ri lio phesy that the Budget will be MinHry--thewisr bei.; J' rbaps fa Without '^xpressin? 1:' l'% state conviction wh .f »? ie kk, servat: actios as to the iJuu6 'Jiifc conservative party, t- ■■ -i chiefs, have expressed their de- term' tÍc., not to offer any factious opposition to the present Government. But I firmly believe, from facts which come to my knowledge, that a desperate oppo- sition will be organised against Ministers on the finan- cial scheme when its details are sought to be put into operation. The Reform Bill was to be the batL1. ground. Now it is to be the Budget. Liberal m, bers and Liberal peers .v, j 11, to ■watch the progress of affairs. sootv»" the o to Che betrothal of the Princess Alice appear to be verified by the evident attention paid by our Court to the Prince of Orange, than there is another J..[, of gossip started. There is now a talk of probable marriage of the Prince of Wales. It is Sfm Me Prince is likely to be married to the Princess J' ndrina, the daughter of Prince Albert of Prussia, a princess of some eighteen years of age. This would strengthen the alliance with Prussia; and I cannot but think that in this respect such a union would be beneficial-not to this country, but to Prussia. These royal alliances must have a gradual effect towards familiarising the people with our institutions, and so produce friendly emulation. It is remarkable, however, that whether it be a husband or a wife that our royal family obtain from the Continent, we generally have to pay the piper at the marriage ceremony. The Prince of Orange, there is no doubt, will take away a large sum of money as dowry while, on the other hand, it is not likely that the Princess Alexandrina will bring much with her. England always has to pay for these things; and it seems now to be taken as a matter of course. The principal fashionable chronicler of the time tells us that the London season will be formally inaugurated on theiSth inst. by the first levee and further informs us that after the reception of the Volunteer Rifle Corps on the 7th of next month her Majesty will pay a short visit to Osborne. I think I can add something to this, if my information prove true. There is a talk of an inspection of the volunteer riflemen by the Queen in Hyde Park, in the course of the summer. There is no doubt that such an inspection would do more to pro- mote the movement than anything else which could be done. At present, however, it is mere rumour. A somewhat curious correspondence has oozed out, as having transpired between Mr. Disraeli and Colonel Rathbone. I will not comment on this further than to say that it shows how extraordinarily careful public men should be in dealing with the numerous applicants whom they have to see and hear from. Many of our pub- lic men have a very ticklish position to occupy, and this becomes more perilous still when they are in office. Their only course is straightforward, and even then their conduct is liable to the greatest misrepresenta- tion. The aspirants to public life, now living in com- parative obscurity, little know the miseries incident to a prominent position. With regard to this corres- pondence, just another deduction may be drawn. It is evident that Mr. Disraeli was virtually editor-in- chief of the Press, and that Mr. Rose, the solicitor of the Carlton Club, had considerable influence over it. These facts incidentally show how important an engine the press of this country is. No man appears to be in too high a position to seek its aid and endea- vour to wield its power. In a week or two we Londoners shall be enjoying the commencement of the musical season. Whatever may be the state of Continental politics, somehow or other, we always have plenty of foreigners over here with extraordinary musical powers. Rumours of coming celebrities" are plentiful; »but perhaps hone is looker forward to with more interest thanJ enny Lincl, as she is still familiarly called. Madame Goldschmidt-who still, I believe, retains her antipathy to sing in operas -which is not perkaps to be wondered at-will, I hear, favour us Londoners with the rich melody of her night- ingale's voice. *A series of concerts is to be given, I believe, at Exeter Hall, in which she will appear. Opinions vary considerably, as far as I have been able to ascertain, with regard to the propriety of that extraordinary gathering which recently took place at midnight at St. James's Restaurant, at the West End. It is one great advantage which the evil sought to be remedied has, that it cannot well be discussed in public, and therefore that it cannot be attacked openly. Whatever opinions, however, may exist as to the propriety of the meeting, there can be none with regard to the probability of a partial success crowning the efforts of the benevolent men who have sought to reclaim their erring and fallen sisters. Several of those institutions which have been established for the reclamation of fallen women are now, in consequence of this meeting, opening their doors to more inmates than they have ever had; while subscriptions are rolling in upon them in benevolent profusion. God speed the effort! Altogether it is one of the most remarkable manifestations of true religion i and benevolence that even these days of philanthropic effort have produced. Most of your readers, I should say, are familiar with the Surrey"Music Hall, by name at least. They may feel some interest in learning that since Mr. Spurgeon ceased to preach there on the Sunday evening the place has been given up to saturnalia which must be very detrimental to the morality of the visitors, supposing of course that any of them take any of that commodity in with them. The sacred music on Sunday even- ing is of course a farce, and there is more Sabbath desecration concentrated on this little spot than perhaps anywhere else in the great modern Babylon. May I ask how it is that his Grace the Archbishop of Canter- bury, who is the ground landlord, allows this sort of thing? I hear that these Bacchanalian and Terpsi- chorean revelries are contrary to the covenants of the lease.

IMPERIAL" PARLIAMENT.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS ON THE…

"JIM MYERS" & THE "FIERY DRAGON"…

ANOTHER MURDER THROUGH DRINK.

EXTRAORDINARY MEETING IN LONDON.

THE DEAN OF CARLISLE AND THE…

THE REAL PITH OF THE BUDGET…

""i A MISERABLE MARRIAGE.'